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DISCOGRAPHY

Music for Planetarium
Jack Dangers
Music for Planetarium

Cover Image
[ORDER NOW]

April 8, 2008

US CD Brainwashed HAND006

  1. Explanation...
  2. Large Magellanic Cloud
  3. Kowal's Object
  4. Lindsay-Shapley Ring
  5. Polarissima Borealis
  6. Minkowski's Object
  7. Pinwheel Galaxy
  8. Horologium Dwarf
  9. Fourcade-Figuero
  10. Burbidge Chain - [MP3]
  11. Whirlpool Galaxy

Electronic Tape Music for T.I.T. Planetarium, Budapest.
recorded under a quilt at night in Marin County, CA
by Jack Dangers at Tape Lab (p) + (c) 2007

hand-set and printed with lead type by Michael Babcock at Interrobang Letterpress

The latest release in the ongoing (and excellent) Brainwashed Handmade series, Music For Planetarium is quite a departure in sound for one Jack Dangers, who already released his tenth album this year under the name Meat Beat Manifesto (Autoimmune). Dangers, who has been releasing music not only at a fairly prolific pace over the past twenty years, has also managed to keep a remarkable level of consistency, and one could argue that his dub-inflected music helped pioneer the way for different splinter-takes on the genre (like dubstep). You'll get no such booming beats and head-crushing rhythms here, though, as this eleven-song, forty-five minute release instead spins off into interstellar space, mixing fuzzy radio static sounds with deep bass rumbles and other groaning drones that definitely call to mind the title. Recorded for the T.I.T. Planetarium in Budapest, this is largely cold, sometimes creepy tape music that sweeps and haunts with undefined figures that lurk around the edges. It's a bit strange too, because the opener "Explanation..." actually sounds like a fairly typical beginning for Dangers, as an old voice sample sets the tone as a rumbling bassline threatens to overtake things. It ramps down as the song ends, though, and from there out it's a shot into more murky depths. As mentioned above, the album seems aptly-titled, but really one could project just about anything onto the amorphous sounds. I certainly wouldn't want to be listening to "Large Metallic Cloud" or "Pinwheel Galaxy" while exploring an abandoned building, but at the same time I imagine that "Polarissima Borealis" or "Fourcade-Figuero" would make the perfect soundtrack for exploring frozen tundra. Other artists have done similar work, and I'm most reminded of Biosphere's excellent Autour De La Lune and even Robert Henke's Signal To Noise. It's not quite the usual work from Dangers, but if you like the aforementioned slabs of ambience, the limited Music For Planetarium is definitely worth snagging before it's gone. - Aaron Coleman, Almost Cool

Over the years, Jack Dangers, maestro behind Meat Beat Manifesto, has made some interesting, thought-provoking, and sometimes intense music. His newest release, Music for Planetarium, consists of eleven tracks commissioned for a planetarium in Budapest, and these eleven tracks most certainly feel like space. These songs are primarily drones, quiet drones, hushed drones, beautiful drones, and they remind me of the wonderful score to 2001. As such, Music for Planetarium is the perfect soundtrack for calm mornings and for quiet nights, and, if you so desire, for star-gazing. According to the notes, it was "recorded under a quilt at night in Marin County, CA." Hmmm...interesting! I've enjoyed the quietness of the tones on this; it's one of the more relaxing records I've heard this year. - Press Play Record


Meat Beat Manifesto, "Autoimmune"
Meat Beat Manifesto
Autoimmune

Cover Image
Meat Beat Manifesto - Autoimmune

April 8, 2008

US CD Metropolis MET531

  1. International
  2. I Hold The Mic!
  3. Hellfire - [MP3]
  4. Less
  5. Solid Waste
  6. Lonely Soldier
  7. Children Of Earth - [MP3]
  8. Young Cassius
  9. Guns N Lovers
  10. Return To Bass
  11. 62 Dub
  12. Colors Of Sound
  13. Spanish Vocoder - [MP3]
  14. International Reprise

Cover by Rich Borge

Meat Beat Manifesto has been hailed as one of the front runners in the electronic music scene since 1987. Front man Jack Dangers has made sure over the years to keep from being categorized into a specific genre by continuously expanding his musical influences and overall direction of Meat Beat Manifesto. The first album, Storm The Studio, was immediately considered an industrial classic. Even with its success, Dangers refused to rest on his laurels and constantly evolved the Meat Beat sound with no two albums sounding exactly alike. Now after many years of silence, Meat Beat Manifesto is back! With this tenth album, Autoimmune, the seminal electronic band is pushing the musical boundaries even further than they've gone before. Focusing on the type of music he likes to create, mastermind Jack Dangers has created a tour de force of electronic genius which is sure to spark renewed interest in the dubstep and electronic music scenes.


Cover Image
Meat Beat Manifesto - Autoimmune

April 7, 2008

UK CD Planet Mu ZIQ202

  1. I Hold The Mic!
  2. Children Of Earth - [MP3]
  3. House of Unique Stink
  4. (Live) And Direct (Live)
  5. Less
  6. Lonely Soldier
  7. Spanish Vocoder - [MP3]
  8. Return To Bass
  9. Guns N Lovers
  10. Hellfire (Remix)

UK 2x12" Planet Mu ZIQ202

side a

  1. I Hold The Mic!
  2. Children Of Earth - [MP3]
  3. House of Unique Stink

side b

  1. (Live) And Direct (Live)
  2. Less

side c

  1. Lonely Soldier
  2. Return To Bass
  3. Guns N Lovers

side b

  1. Spanish Vocoder - [MP3]
  2. Hellfire (Remix)

Jack Dangers - things
Lynn Farmer - drums
Ben Stokes - video
Mark Pistel - wires
Daddy Sandy toasts on "I Hold the Mic!"
Azeem - on the mic
DJ Z-Trip - on turntables

Led by sound sculptor and producer extraordinaire Jack Dangers, MBM continues to evolve. Its tenth album pushes musical boundaries further than it has before, creating a masterpiece of dubstep and electronica. "I feel closest to the Dubstep trend," says Jack. "I feel like Dub has always been part of my sound". Guest vocalist Daddy Sandy features on "I Hold the Mic!", and the techno-tinged "Spanish Vocoder" touches on his early techno roots. "Every record is different," Jack explains, "and in this record I focused on what I like to do versus what other people like me to do: beats, bass and distortion." Meat Beat Manifesto's constantly evolving musical invention has generated a long string of influential futuristic classics , including such tracks as "God O.D.","Psyche Out", "Helter Skelter", "Radio Babylon", "Edge of No Control" and "It's The Music" whilst the single, "Prime Audio Soup"(from the album Actual Sounds and Voices) was featured in the sci-fi fantasy blockbuster The Matrix and on its platinum-selling soundtrack.

Meat Beat Manifesto have been on the music scene long enough now for the term veteran to seem almost painfully apt. Yet after ten albums and more than twenty years spent riding the choppy waves of contemporary music, they have somehow remained on the outskirts of things while like-minded artists have lapped up the applause. One need only think of what happened to Orbital after the brown album to see the vastly different trajectories the two superficially quite similar bands have taken in the last decade and a half. Indeed, while the Hartnoll brothers were almost instantly deified following their first appearance at Glastonbury in 1994, MBM moved to Trent Reznor's Nothing Records and promptly slid out of view. But several records have followed since, and while the Orbital bandwagon has long since shuddered to a halt, Jack Dangers remains, his status assured through longevity as much as anything else. Autoimmune finds him in a typically restless mood, flitting intermittently between techno, dub, breakbeat and, perhaps most surprisingly, dubstep. Yet when one thinks of Planet Mu's increasing associations with the dubstep scene, it perhaps shouldn't raise too many eyebrows to see Dangers experimenting with the form here. The label has moved beyond its early incarnation as a slightly quirky younger brother to Aphex Twin's Rephlex stable and is now one of the most high-profile record labels putting out dubstep records today. Thus, in theory at least, Autoimmune slots neatly into the broad and accommodating musical policy of the label. When we learn from Dangers, however, that his intention here is to intertwine dubstep with his earlier techno-inflected sound, the pigeonholing seems less appropriate. And so the music that results is more an all-encompassing attempt to swallow up several musical genres in one audacious mouthful than anything else. This has its advantages, in that it allows the album to go off in different directions, often at the same time. Tracks as varied as the spacey, glitchy techno of Guns 'n' Lovers and the ragga rhythms of I Hold The Mic! show off the success of such an approach. But they also water down the album's central thrust. What at times looks certain to turn into a deep, dark examination of dubstep mechanics falls away before any momentum can be genuinely sustained. This leaves excellent stand-alone tracks like Hellfire looking a little lost, and gives the album's overall structure a ragged, confused feel. Which is a shame, because there is almost a very good album here. The notoriously eclectic Dangers might not be one to admit it, but his own magpie aesthetic could now and again do with being very gently kicked into touch. Yet with so many artists from the scene's early days now too rich or too musically adrift to retain any relevance, it's refreshing to see a man in his forties continuing to tap into the sound of today without seeming decades out of date. - Robert Rowlands, The Milk Factory

cover image The tenth studio album by Jack Dangers' main musical outlet takes a maximalist approach, combining apocalyptic dubstep and industrial-strength breakbeats with the assimilative spirit of a beat hacker. In the process, he creates an album true to the MBM legacy: one foot in cyber-age cross-genre multimedia assemblage, and one foot firmly planted in the timeless psychedelic ocean of sound. Autoimmune refers to reactions which inolve the body's immune system misrecognizing certain constituent parts of the self, and attacking them as if they were foreign invaders, the other. In a world in which fiercely pitched ideological and physical battles are being waged in the name of nationhood, religion, ethnicity and class--all of which hinge on the differential identity of self and other--autoimmunity becomes an interesting metaphor for political and cultural unrest. This bodily metaphor may be particularly close to Jack Dangers, as he suffers from psoriatic arthropathy (the Singing Detective disease), an autoimmune disorder, and thus is the living embodiment of the self turned against itself, the breakdown of the "body politic" metaphor in the age of unprecedented control, wiretapping, globalization, climate change, sleeper cells and hacktivism. Though the embodied, rhythmic ("meat beat") manifestoes of Dangers have always danced at the edge of politics, this album seems particularly apocalyptic, an acknowledgment of a world gone mad. The album opens with the introductory "International," trying to cleanse the geopolitical borders literally and metaphorically from the outset. The dense layers of sound and samples from radio and television place the album immediately in the territory that MBM inhabits so well: the multimedia, audiovisual perceptual landscape. "I Hold the Mic!" is pulse-pounding dubstep with dancehall vocals and yawning layers of echoplexed sounds, the audio equivalent of Tokyo's Ginza district as seen in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, a teeming human metropolis in which all markers of nationality, ethnicity and language have disappeared, and all that remains is a confounding, extra-geographical hybrid. "Hellfire" gets more diabolical, with a vocal formant synth spitting out nonsense syllables over a deep, resonant dubstep groove that keeps dipping itself into the fiery magma of distortion, with haunting X-Files melodies weaving in and out, and frequent samples of the familiar phrase "This is a test." It's interesting to compare this track to something that The Orb might have done in the late 1990s: the techniques are similar, but MBM ends up with a track that is less playful, more urgent. "Children of Earth" is a standout, beginning with a child intoning "Hello from the children of planet Earth," and quickly entering the land of loping, rubbery riddims and elastic acid basslines that fly across the stereo channels. It's a particularly frightening soundworld, bearing some similarity to the backing tracks created by The Bug and J.K. Broadrick for their Techno Animal hardcore HipHop project. On tracks like this and "Guns n' Lovers," MBM seems to nod to past associations with industrial music, as these rhythms never tire of toying with barely-reigned-in distortion, constantly flirting with the red, and never shying away from playing up the machine aesthetic, reminding us of our technological inheritance rather than attempting to obscure the methods of production. "Return to Bass" sounds like something that might be at home on the Ant-Zen label, if any of the artists on Ant-Zen were interested in bringing some groove along with their taste for violent distortion. It's Miami Bass for a generation weaned on Venetian Snares and Otto Von Schirach. "62 Dub" is the closest Dangers gets to bringing a rocksteady, traditional dub groove, but it is still dark and distorted as fuck, with treated didgeridoo (a la Love's Secret Domain-era Coil), and echo drops that make me feel like I've suddenly lost my footing and I'm falling through a vacuum. "Colors of Sound" is something else entirely, a whole track given over to the chirping of analog synths, weird alien skronk from a galaxy of wacky oscillators and filters, complete with tape-cuing sounds just like vintage musique concrete. It's an interesting ambient stopgap, and sounds like nothing else on the album. Eclectic is never a bad word in my book. Then comes my favorite track, "Spanish Vocoder," which combines the hardcore breakbeat of earlier tracks with some devious and delicious Detroit electro action. I don't mind HipHop and dubstep, but electro is like crack to me, and Dangers really knows how to bring the Cybotron in his own inimitable style. Though this track certainly feels a brighter and less apocalyptic than the rest of the album, it nevertheless maintains an intensity and urgency, with chopped-up vocoderized vocals and layers of choral voices weaving in and out of the mix. The didgeridoo is also back, this time treated to sound like a buzzsaw. By the end, the track fades out into ambient territory, with only the vocodered voice left to frantically attempt to communicate its message, fading out into deep space. MBM certainly aren't the first to link up electronic music with cyber-age political outrage, but they do an excellent job of it. Part of what makes Autoimmune work is that its nods to contemporary trends--British dubstep, HipHop, post-Jungle IDM--are combined with sounds that are utterly out of fashion, and would sound more at home with the outmoded '90s chillout-rave or breakbeat sound. This isn't a problem for Dangers, who is clearly uninterested in staking out a clear position in the marketplace, instead allowing his eclecticism free reign. Paradoxically, this gives the album a timeless quality, as it moves between eras and styles effortlessly, evoking the contemporary mediascape in which time seems indefinitely frozen, and past and present sprawl out in front of us on the magic screen, organizing themselves in infinite combinations, with unpredictable results. - Jonathan Dean, Brainwashed

Meat Beat Manifesto's brainchild, Jack Dangers, has said of his new material on Autoimmune that he feels "closest" amongst his sonic peers to those in the dubstep scene. Cynical ears might attribute Dangers's remarks to a half-hearted guerilla marketing campaign by a has-been hipster trying to make his rusty wires relevant to disintegrating audiences. This, however, reflects a poor sense of history. Dangers has for years been a mystic figure lurking around in the nursery at the genesis of myriad electronic fashions and fancies. His early solo work, in print for the first time in 20 years as last year's Archive Things: 1982-1988, sounds like something that could be debuting at this year's No Fun Festival. Pre-Meat band Perennial Divide was one of the loudest bands of its time, and an early fusioneer of squeal and dance beats. Meat Beat Manifesto's first album, Storm the Studio, established the outfit as an uncompromising force of sampledelic sound collage (the title comes from a William S. Burroughs snippet), borrowing ideas liberally from hip-hop, which was still shunned in those days, even in the rockist college scene. And though they came to be defined by hip-hop, and later, dub, Meat Beat Manifesto never exceeded its welcome within the genre limits and began to evolve outwardly to both anticipate and develop the margins of EBM, drum n' bass, trip-hop, big beat, illbient, ambient, and even mashups through Dangers's production work for Emergency Broadcast Network. I'd even go so far as to call Subliminal Sandwich an early hauntological masterwork. Yet, as far out as Meat Beat Manifesto's sound reached, it maintained commonalities (subterranean bass, funky breaks, atomic age samples) that got the band incongruously pegged as trend hoppers who kept making the same album. True to form, Autoimmune stays the same by being different. The samples are present, but sparse and redistributed in a way that almost makes them feel obsolete. Past Manifestoes have weltered in a kitsch aural collision of various pasts, but many of Autoimmune's more exciting moments come from its embrace of modernism, like its dubsteppers ("Lonely Soldier", "Guns N Lovers"). The signature subsonic bass remains on these and other tracks, the same one that inspired rumors that the band once hit the brown note at an early gig, but the bass's biophysical targets are here geared more towards rumble pack shocks of the gut rather than ass-shaking vibrations inspired to move the legs on up. It's perhaps Meat Beat Manifesto's first ghettoblaster, riddim and bruise for an car ride across the new industrial landscape. Years after the days of industrial music, the new sounds of kling klang are the pin drops in isolated and condemned factories, the moans of urban ghettos, and the robotic arms of tighteningly regimented power structures. "Hellfire" skitter-beats across a dubscape of short-wave radio squeals and hiccupping voices from the real emergency broadcast network ("this is only a test"), with the addition of minimalist high-pitched Mellotron notes making for a maddeningly incessant and dark journey. "Less" and "62 Dub" achieve similar ends with little to no melody. Warped effects and grinding echodrones guide the way through these songs and highlight Dangers's brilliance as a producer who works with a meticulous layer-cake methodology. Each of these tracks, much like the best of dubstep, contains a fungal aura of inertia creeps that harnesses threat and terror without ever going in for an attack. When several voices appear from the ether to simply repeat the word "nothing" in "Less", as if the song was spiraling downward until it reached oblivion, the antagonistic nihilism, especially in one particular vocoded robot who sings the word "nuuuh-thing" in a mocking tone, leaves an unmistakable chill rolling down one's back. Dangers has been particularly prolific these past few years, releasing a dub re-interpretation of RUOK?, musique concrete work for Important Records, and even a jazz album with Thirsty Ear. Along with Autoimmune, these experiments finally make Meat Beat Manifesto sound like an adventurous band trying out new things rather than making the most Meat Beat Manifesto interpretation of varying styles. That makes Autoimmune's failures more acutely upsetting. Opener "International" is a minute and 40 seconds long, goes nowhere beyond a mere introduction, and feels like the MBM business card. It has the token global radio sign-ons, a stale familiar break, and some sampled brass hits that fall totally out of step with the rest of the album. Worse, the track returns in "reprise" form at album's end to function as opening and closing credits. Dangers would have done fine to jump right in with the frantic reggaeton of "I Hold the Mic", which bears some resemblance to Subliminal Sandwich's "Nuclear Bomb" (both feature Daddy Sandy on vocals), though not nearly as apocalyptic as that track or the next few that follow on Autoiummune. While "I Hold the Mic" succeeds by being derivative of a style perfected by Meat Beat Manifesto years ago that happened to be ahead of its time (making it quite relevant now), "Spanish Vocoder" just feels like a tired retread. Repeating the bleeps and bloops of legendary Meat Beat Manifesto songs like "It's the Music" is not necessarily a bad thing, but "Spanish Vocoder" is tame and tepid, which cuts against the profusion of dense architecture elsewhere in this collection. "Young Cassius", featuring the San Francisco MC Azeem rapping atop substandard Meat Beat Manifesto fare, is a pure hip-hop track whose backing music essentially amounts to a canny breakbeat and some flimsy deep bass curdles. It's not the only venture back to hip-hop though. "Solid Waste" revives the monotone, almost slam poetry-esque Dangers rap featured on so many early Meat Beat recordings. The tactic has aged pretty well, actually, all things considered. Dangers uses the lyrical opportunity to rail against the vapor trails that the title material, defined in an opening stretch-marked sample as "the visible leftovers of our consumption", imprints against the international psyche to the point where "Common sense seems to take offense" and "Life has lost all its appeal". It's hard not being transported to a different time when hearing the track, which used to be part of why you turned on a Meat Beat Manifesto record. Retro-retro futurism isn't nearly as appealing as the real thing, though. And on Autoimmune, there's too much good nowism going on to settle for imitations. - Timothy Gabriele, PopMatters

You're Skyping a friend who's studying in Europe, while WOWing a player in Japan, while live-blogging the news reports of a protest in Tibet. What time is it? Where are you? Who, even, are you? These were questions you might have been able to ask before you entered the Matrix. Not anymore. Bookended by the tracks "International" and "International Reprise," Meat Beat Manifesto's latest album Autoimmune charts the global map of this electronic age. Autoimmune remains true to MBM's dance-club roots. Its five-minute tracks reveal little more to concentrating listeners than to listeners distracted by dance partners' legs. MBM doesn't set out to surprise the listener. That's not to say that the songs remain static. They morph undercover-a flow of sound, one element bleeding into another, rather than a shift. Throughout the album, voices (at times British, at times Jamaican, at times Spanish, Portuguese, Russian), drum rhythms, city sounds and digital glitches all share the same soundscape. Reduced to zeroes and ones, the sounds of the lived world enter our ears as binary bricolage. More than just reinterpreting the sounds of the known world through computer circuitry, MBM discovers unknown cyberspaces. "Spanish Vocoder" begins on a city street but then repositions the listener at the bottom of the sea, the sounds muffled under water; then in outer space, cosmic rays shooting off into infinite; and then in a dungeon, wet drips echoing against stone walls, before ending with a feedback glitch fade out. Informed by the Internet and gaming, today's listener navigates this fragmentary positioning with ease. Modem dial-up rings and gaming soundtracks, however, don't count as music for most. MBM's robo aesthetic, more HAL than Haydn, might pass for music at a laser tag arena, but not on an iPod. -Ian Ferguson, The Daily Californian

"Autoimmune," the latest disc from influential electro-innovator Jack Dangers, is an electronic melting pot that retains the traditional Meat Beat Manifesto sound while shifting into new musical territory. Though the opening track's sliced-up breakbeats and public radio samples echo 1998's "Actual Sounds and Voices," the album soon veers off into Autechre-style glitch with "Less," distorted proto-dub with "Solid Waste," Download-esque sound-collage with "Colors of Sound," and nearly every electronic genre in between. MBM records have never been known for sticking to one specific style, but "Autoimmune" sees Dangers continuing to explore and combine even further musical regions. Just look to the track "Young Cassius," which takes some furious MCing, then mashes them up with trip-hop atmospherics, big beat style breaks and vocoded samples. And if that isn't enough to satisfy you, it's followed by "Guns N' Lovers," which sounds like bar music from a William Gibson novel. If you're already a Meat Beat Manifesto fan, "Autoimmune" will give you another solid reason to look down upon the uninformed plebs with disdain. If you're new to Dangers' sound-stylings, but you've liked some form of electronica, be it industrial, big beat, drum and bass, IDM, trip-hop, or anything else under the bloody sun, this is as great album to start with. There may not be anything as hook-laden as "Paradise Now" or "Asbestos Lead Asbestos," but the album makes up for it through its sheer sonic variety. Consider it a vaccine against your stagnating record collection and hook yourself up now. - Calder Fertig, ABORT Magazine


Lonely Soldier
Meat Beat Manifesto
Lonely Soldier/Guns N Lovers

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March 23, 2008

UK 12" Planet Mu ZIQ201

side a

  1. Lonely Soldier (remix)
  2. Hellfire

side b

  1. Guns N Lovers (remix)

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March 18, 2008

US DOWNLOAD Metropolis

  1. Guns N Lovers (remix)
  2. Guns N Lovers
  3. Lonely Soldier (remix)
  4. Hellfire (remix)

Jack Dangers


Meat Beat Manifesto - Archive Things 1982-1988/Perennial Divide - Purged
Meat Beat Manifesto/Perennial Divide
Archive Things 1982-1988/Purged

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May 2007

US CDx2

disc a: Meat Beat Manifesto - Archive Things 1982-1988

  1. Guitarworks
  2. 1234
  3. West Window
  4. Falling
  5. B.R.E.L.
  6. International Disease
  7. Dirty Ray
  8. I Got the Fear (demo)
  9. Design for Living
  10. Kneel and Buzz
  11. Untitled 5
  12. Snareworks
  13. Synthesizer Test
  14. Lid Locks
  15. Let's Go Disco 7"

disc b: Perennial Divide - Purged [img]

  1. Blow (instrumental)
  2. Parricide (instrumental)
  3. Word of the Lord (instrumental)
  4. Captain Swing (instrumental)
  5. Rescue (instrumental)
  6. The Fall (instrumental)
  7. Trip (instrumental)
  8. Tuna Hell (instrumental)
  9. Burning Dogs (instrumental)
  10. End of the Line (instrumental)
  11. Burn Down (promotional 7" radio edit)
  12. Permanent Way (promotional 7" radio edit)
  13. Beehead 7" - [SOX020]
  14. Leathernecks 7"
  15. E.C.T. 7"

All titles by Jack Dangers
Paul Freegard (A1, A2, A3, B1-15)
Jonny Stephens (B1-15)
Searly (B1-15)
Ward (B1-15)
Andy Partridge (production: B13)
Colin James (engineering: B14-15)

A1, A2, A8 were given away as free downloads from tapelab.org

A1-3: Recorded at Tudor Studios 1982
A4-11: Recorded at Shed Studio 1984-1987
A7-11: Original MBM demos recorded on Portsastudio 244 1986-1987
A12-15: Recorded at Drive Studios, Swindon UK 1989
B1-10 are the instrumental mix of the album Purge, recorded in 1986, remixed in 1988 but never released.
B14-15 are MBM remixes of the 12" Leathernecks, recorded and mixed at Slaughterhouse, Driffield UK, 1988.

"Prior to Meat Beat Manifesto there was Perennial Divide. Archive Things/Purged features unreleased tracks and instrumental versions from Perennial Divide. Also included are some of the original MBM demo tracks. Some of these tracks are 25 years old and never before available on CD. The original demos, to me, always had more bite than the actual first release. So here they are....." - Jack Dangers, San Francisco, 2007


Meat Beat Manifesto - Travelogue: Live '05
Meat Beat Manifesto
Travelogue: Live '05

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Nov 21, 2006

US DVD Music Video Dist. MVD4542

  1. Hello Cleveland
  2. I Am Electro
  3. Spinning Round
  4. Radio Babylon
  5. Japan
  6. God O.D.
  7. Europe
  8. No Purpose No Design
  9. Southern States
  10. She's Unreal/Helter Skelter
  11. The Light Incident
  12. Edge Of No Control
  13. Prime Audio Soup

Jack Dangers - Video Sampler, Vocals, Synthi Aks, Bass Flute
Ben Stokes - Video Sampler, DVJ
Mark Pistel - Sampler, Serge Modular
Lynn Farmer - Drums

Recorded live at Cabaret Metro in Chicago on June 22nd, 2005 at the same concert as the Live '05 CD.

This tour DVD features an engaging performance at the Cabaret Metro in Chicago on June 22nd 2005. The group seen here includes Jack Dangers (video sampler/AKS/vocals), Ben Stokes (video sampler), Mark Pistel (Serge modular/Ableton Live), and Lynn Farmer (V-Drums). Footage from Austin, Berlin, and Osaka is also included. The collective began in 1987 as an experimental/industrial duo inspired by the cut-and-paste attitudes of hip-hop and dub. Eventually, MBM became a vehicle for Dangers to explore the emerging trends in electronica. Their approach to studio recording has been widely influential; here they translate it into a killer live show.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Live '05
Meat Beat Manifesto
Live '05

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Feb 9, 2006

US CD

  1. I Am Electro
  2. Spinning Round
  3. Hello Teenage America
  4. Radio Babylon
  5. God O.D
  6. No Purpose No Design
  7. It's The Music
  8. Nuclear Bomb
  9. Helter Skelter
  10. Edge Of No Control
  11. Prime Audio Soup
  12. Do It With Soul

Jack Dangers - Video Sampler, Vocals, Synthi Aks, Bass Flute
Ben Stokes - Video Sampler, DVJ
Mark Pistel - Sampler, Serge Modular
Lynn Farmer - Drums

Recorded live at Cabaret Metro in Chicago on June 22nd, 2005 at the same concert as the Travelogue: Live '05 DVD. Was originally sold only at shows on the second leg of the At The Center tour in the U.S. in Spring, 2006. This is a limited edition of 1,000 and each disc is packaged in a digipak signed and customized by Jack Dangers. On the reverse side, near the center of the disc, the text "NEAT BEAT MANIFESTO-LIVE '05" is printed.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Lovefingers
Meat Beat Manifesto
Lovefingers/Radio Free Republic

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June 1, 2005

US 7" Brainwashed brain009

  1. Radio Free Republic - [MP3]
  2. Lovefingers - [MP3]

Jack Dangers
Lynn Farmer - Drums [A]
Mike Powell - Samples and keys [A]
John Wilson - Guitar [A]

"Lovefingers" is a Silver Apples cover and was recorded live on Saturday, September 28, 1996 at the Fillmore, San Francisco.

"Radio Free Republic" is an exclusive track.

53 editions come numbered in a special sleeve handmade by Jack Dangers.

handmade sleeves image
Cover #52 (MPEG)
Cover #53 (MPEG)

Meat Beat Manifesto (a band hardly needing an introduction) offer a stellar slab of fried sounds. Side A, "Lovefingers," is a Silver Apples cover, which opens with a clip of a woman retelling a story of her husband (I think) claiming he'd been attacked by a spaceship. This leads perfectly into a catchy, psychedelic and mutated groove, bringing to mind early Faust. This comparison is hammered home when a blast of oscillators and fuzzy filters splatter themselves across the rest of the grooves. Side B follows a similar pattern with "Radio Free Republic." Starting with a voice sample (presumably from a b-movie), it moves into a heavily rhythm-centric pattern which slowly develops over a shifting pallette of synthesizer bleeps and bloops. - Dick Baldwin, FakeJazz

Where in the past Jack Dangers was the man you seek out for some pre-Big Beat busy prehistoric electronics and bollock kicking breaks here we find him at his monitor a little more relaxed. Still peppering his tracks with samples, he moves further into a Hip-Hop Techno area on "Radio Free Republic" where aggression and pace are not the norm. More interestingly is the Silver Apples cover on the A side which is a short blast of harsh electronic pop ending prematurely in short wave radio abuse. - Scott McKeating, Stylus

We have another sexy Brainwashed 7" in this week. This one is by Meat Beat Manifesto and it's on super thick weapon stylee grey vinyl. You know someone ordered a record this week and referred to it as a plate. I've never had that happen to me before but it did amuse me. Holding this sturdy little fella makes me realise if you didn't like the music you could tape up the hole in the middle and use it as some kind of stupid dining service. However if you did that it would be criminal cos here we have a totally cool slab of Jack Dangers instrumental hip hop infused brilliance which doesn't sound too unlike Boards of Canada to be honest. And there's a cracking Silver Apples cover of Lovefingers on the B side. This be my single of the week... - Norman Records


Meat Beat Manifesto - Off-Centre
Meat Beat Manifesto
Off-Centre

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Off-Centre - EP

October 25, 2005

US 12"/CDEP Thirsty Ear THI57164

  1. Wild (Rmx)
  2. Postcards
  3. Maintain Discipline
  4. Dummyhead Stereo
  5. Shotgun! (blast to the brain) (live)
  6. Prime Audio Soup (live)

Jack Dangers - Bass, Bass Flute, Bass Clarinet, Everything Else
Peter Gordon - Flute (1)
Dave King - Drums, Percussion (1-4)
Craig Taborn - Steinway Grand Piano, Fender Rhodes, Clavinet, Hammond B3 (1-4)
Ben Stokes - Video Sampler, DVJ (5/6)
Mark Pistel - Sampler, Serge Modular (5/6)
Lynn Farmer - Drums (5/6)

Remixes and outtakes from the At The Center sessions. Tracks 5 & 6 recorded live at Cabaret Metro in Chicago on June 22nd, 2005 at the same concert as the Live '05 CD and Travelogue: Live '05 DVD


Meat Beat Manifesto - At the Center
Meat Beat Manifesto
At the Center

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - At the Center

May 24, 2005

US CD Thirsty Ear THI57159

  1. Wild - [MP3]
  2. Flute Thang
  3. Murita Cycles
  4. Want Ads One - [MP3]
  5. Blind
  6. Musica Classica - [MP3]
  7. Bohemian Grove
  8. United Nations etc etc
  9. Want Ads Two
  10. The Water Margin - [MP3]
  11. Shotgun! (blast to the brain) - [MP3]
  12. Granulation 1

Jack Dangers - Bass, Bass Flute, Bass Clarinet, Everything Else
Peter Gordon - Flute
Dave King - Drums, Percussion
Craig Taborn - Steinway Grand Piano, Fender Rhodes, Clavinet, Hammond B3

Produced and engineered by Jack Dangers.

Acknowledged as an innovator in the electronic music scene, MBM continues to stretch sonic boundaries and influence new generations of sound activists. Past production/remixing projects include Public Enemy, David Bowie, Orbital, Nine Inch Nails, David Byrne, Bush, Depeche Mode, and Tower Of Power. Supporting the group on this release are Blue Series alumni Craig Taborn on keyboards, Bad Plus skinsman Dave King, and Peter Gordon on flute. "Without MBM's groundbreaking amalgams of hip-hop and industrial dance music, modern dance music genres such as big beat and drum and bass wouldn't exist...one of Britain's most inventive practitioners of sampladelic funk"--Alternative Press.

Jack Dangers' latest album continues to push the envelope. Jack was one of the main innovators of electronic music in the 1990s. Nowadays he has turned his attention to merging electronic music with jazz. At The Center is a hypnotic synthesis of the two worlds. These compositions feature rhythms similar to those found on earlier Meat Beat Manifesto releases...but the instrumental layers are quite different. The songs on this album are extremely fluid and trippy and feature the talents of Craig Taborn (keyboards), Dave King (drums), and Peter Gordon (flute). In many cases, the music on this disc sounds otherworldly and peculiar...and yet those solid funky rhythms somehow manage to hold things together nicely. This album may lose many early MBM fans but if so...those early fans will, in the end, be the real losers. Excellent material from a man who is still in his prime. (Rating: 5+) - LMNOP

When I was in high school, my friends and I used to have this discussion all the time about how Jack Dangers had such a signature sound that he could take anyone else's song and remix it into something that was unmistakably Meat Beat Manifesto. It shouldn't come as any surprise then that some fifteen years later when Dangers has taken on the task of producing a jazz record for Thirsty Ear, that the result still sounds like quintessential Meat Beat. While jazz sampling and experimentation are nothing new to the Meat Beat catalog, this is the first record in a long and noteworthy career that is explicitly anchored more in the jazz tradition than in the world of club music, hip hop, and dub. I should note that I don't listen to much jazz: I know what I like and numerous attempts to get into jazz have just left me to conclude that the genre as a whole is not really my cup of tea. However, a record like At The Center exists to change that. Thirsty Ear has been building a catalog that could be described as "jazz for people who don't like jazz" by courting people from the electronic music world and getting them to participate in 'The Blue Series.' Records from DJ Spooky, DJ Wally, Spring Heel Jack and others have all found their way into my record collection as ambassadors to a sound and style and tradition that I don't usually embrace. Of the Blue Series records I've heard, At The Center is perhaps the one that manages to keep the most of its creator's original identity in place while staying faithful to the intention of the project. This record is comprised of wiggly flute and clarinet pieces, upright bass, shuffling drum beats, playful stabs of piano, and odd samples--the usual. The sounds themselves aren't particularly new for a Meat Beat release, but they are cleaner and less processed than usual, giving the record much more of an improvised and live feel. Only one track is longer than six minutes, and that's perhaps the greatest success for this record: that it manages to explore and stretch without getting self-indulgent the way some jazz does. That's not to say the record is made up completely of gems. There are two tracks with an extended recording of someone reading quirky want ads in a strange voice, and while the tracks were funny the first or second time I heard them, they drag on after many more listens. However, astute listeners will hear some faint recycling of jazz touches and melodic phrases from older Meat Beat records worked into the fray and that kind of self-sampling even when the instruments are being played live is so necessarily Meat Beat Manifesto that the record ultimately breezes past any low points. At The Center makes genre and style irrelevant to the equation of enjoying music, and that's what it's all about in the end. Like many other talented multi-instrumentalists and composers, the result of the work is less about songs that fulfill a stylistic promise and more about their creator's will imposing itself regardless of the format, rules, or expectations. That Dangers is backed by a talented gang of players only makes the disc that much more of a success. - Matthew Jeanes, Brainwashed

Meat Beat Manifesto main man Jack Dangers has made a career out of continually being at the forefront of electronic music. From his early industrial-tinged material with then-collaborator Johnny Stevens, to explorations of trip-hop, house, jungle, dub, and beyond, Dangers has never remained in one place for too long. At the Center, his first full length of all-new material since 2002's RUOK?, continues the evolution by combining his signature break-beats and samples with jazz provided by flutist Peter Gordon, drummer Dave King, and keyboardist Craig Taborn. From start to finish, At the Center covers a wide range of moods. The disc begins with "Wild", a slow, slinking number that builds layers of breaking beats, flute, and organ. It slides almost seamlessly into "Flute Thang", which lives up to its name with extensive flute soloing over piano arpeggios and short guitar bursts. "Bohemian Grove" has a middle-eastern flair, with prominent sitar over string swells, while, "United Nations Etc. Etc" evokes Daft Punk with a muffled, bouncy bass line and twisting keyboard noodling. Finally, the disc's closer, "Granulation 1", is a creepy combination of haunting background surges and off-kilter piano, leaving the listener quite a distance from where he or she began. The album ambles on in an almost hypnotic fashion, sidling from track to track, switching between purely instrumental tracks and ambient soundscapes with vocal samples. Two such tracks, "Want Ads One" and "Want Ads Two", feature a comical voice-over reading want ads from a newspaper over atmospheric noise. The combination of styles creates balance, and it keeps the listener from getting too comfortable with the disc as a whole. The bulk of the album is jazz-fused, however, and the musicians play off of each other superbly, never stealing the spotlight, but never coming off as tacked on either. For this record, at least, Meat Beat Manifesto sounds as much like a band as a single musician, something Dangers has never really done before. The real strength of At the Center is just how contemporary it sounds. Dangers never succumbs to the temptation to phone it in, and he never relegates himself to simply giving in and playing generic pop music. For an artist to consistently push the envelope for over 15 years is a marvel, yet Meat Beat Manifesto can easily stand shoulder to shoulder with the current round of lap-top composers, most of whom are building off of his work in the first place. -Cory D. Byrom, Pitchfork


Jack Dangers - Loudness Clarifies / Music from Tapelab
Jack Dangers
Loudness Clarifies / Music from Tapelab

Cover Image

November 2, 2004

US CDx2 Important IMPREC042

disc a

  1. Annihilating Rhythm
  2. Musical Experiences
  3. Individual 1
  4. Individual 2
  5. Listen for the Echo
  6. Boss Society?
  7. Encoder
  8. Super Hit 9
  9. Solid Gold
  10. Servile Days
  11. Granulation-2
  12. The Aeolian Arp

disc b

  1. track 1
  2. track 2
  3. track 3
  4. track 4
  5. track 5
  6. track 6
  7. track 7
  8. track 8
  9. track 9
  10. track 10

Jack Dangers - all instruments

Following the success of Forbidden Planet Explored, Jack's soundtrack for the legendary sci-fi film Forbidden Planet, Jack has brought us a brand new Meat Beat style manifestation and a collection of 10 years worth of his electro-acoustic musique concrete. Loudness Clarifies/Music From Tapelab brings forth both sides of Jack Dangers multi-dimensional audio personality into one single commercial package neatly designed by Almighty. From the distant, careful, experimentalism found in Music From Tapelab to the dance floor oriented Loudness Clarifies we experience Jack as a whole musical entity.

Jack Dangers has increased his musical output in recent years, spitting out a string of records under his own name, Meat Beat Manifesto, and Tino Corp, pushing his style into heretofore unheard directions. With Loundness Clarifies, Dangers essentially bridges the gap between the comfortable, groove-oriented material that everyone associates with Meat Beat Manifesto, and his more experimental, offbeat tendencies when working without the expectations of the "Meat Beat brand." Of course, Meat Beat records have always had a touch of the obscure and absurd in them, but after listening to the last few albums and comparing them to the early work, some of the daring experimentation seemed to be missing in favor of tighter grooves. Here, Dangers seems to be going for the logical connection between the grooves and beats for which he is so well known, and the studio antics and manipulation of sound that is close to his heart. Loudness Clarifies plays more with distortion and strange frequencies than anything heard from Jack in a long time. The beats are crunchy electro wiggles, breaks-overdriven and run along with a warbly bass that at times consumes them. Dangers' typical analog synth fascination is in full effect, but the tones are all slightly detuned, bent, filtered, or otherwise molested into something a bit darker and less accessible than might be expected. This is not to say that the record is a full-on excursion into DSP-noodle-land. In fact, far from it, the album sounds more akin to the kind of records Dangers was making over a decade ago as it's full of the warm hum of tubes and transistors and tapeloops whizzing by. Not Breathing's Dave Wright plays the flange on the opening track (the first time I've ever seen flange credited as a performance) and bass on another, while The Bass Kittens' Jon Drukman has a go with some crispy fried electro rhythms on "Super Hit 9" that give the album some of its best and weirdest moments. As if a new and style-stretching release from Dangers wasn't enough, the package also includes some of Dangers' electro-acoustic and found-sound collage work entitled Electronic Music From Tapelab. Fans of Dangers' work won't be surprised by the weird, disembodied voices and radio static and analog squiggles that poke out from the speakers in this collection of ten studio tracks recorded for film, radio, and television, but they may not be overwhelmed by the disc either. As music concrÍte records go, it is an impeccible studio effort and showcases Dangers' uncanny use of space and ability to isolate the best parts of sounds. However, as music written for film, radio, and TV, it tends to lack a narrative center that might be provided by visuals or some other accompanying context. Take the audio accompaniment and sound design out of its narrative environment, and it tends to be hit or miss based on the quality of the sounds alone. This is, of course, the point of such a record, but like looking through the portfolio of your favorite designer, there are going to be pieces that grab you, moments that speak to you, and others that are easily skipped. Electronic Music From Tapelab is a fun sound design experience, but I'm not liable to spin it as frequently as its more structured, song-based younger brother. Important packages both discs in a nice cardboard double pack, and taken as a whole, it's impossible not to like. - Matthew Jeanes, Brainwashed

What Steve Reich and John Cage did with electronics and musique concrète in the 20th century, Jack Dangers is deftly handling in the 21st. Loudness Clarifies/Electronic Music From Tapelab is his sophomore double-set for ¡mportant!, featuring guests David Wright (Code Indigo, Callisto) and Jon Drukman (Bass Kittens, The Ultraviolet Catastrophe). Dangers gets dancey first with Meat Beat Manifesto-esque boombity-boom beats-and-breaks on disc one, and electro-noodly on the next, with nifty goodies from his Marin Tapelab studio. His hero is the ultra-rare (as in one left) 600-lb. EMS Synthi 100 and its awesome bloops and bleeps. Dangers' dual sounds endure masterfully! - Stacy Meyn, XLR8R


Jack Dangers - Forbidden Planet Explored / Sci-Fi Sound Effects
Jack Dangers
Forbidden Planet Explored / Sci-Fi Sound Effects

Cover Image

Jack Dangers - Forbidden Planet Explored

August 3, 2004

US CDx2 Important IMPREC038

disc a

  1. Main Titles/Overture
  2. Deceleration
  3. Once Around Altair
  4. Landing
  5. Flurry of Dust - A Robot Approaches
  6. Shangri-La in the Desert With Cuddly Tiger
  7. Graveyard - A Night With Two Moons
  8. Robby, Make Me a Gown
  9. Invisible Monster Approaches
  10. Robby Arranges Flowers, Zaps Monkey
  11. Love at the Swimming Hole
  12. Morbius' Study
  13. Ancient Krell Music
  14. Mind Booster - Creation of Matter
  15. Krell Shuttle Ride and Power Station
  16. Robby, The Cook, And 60 Gallons of Booze
  17. Giant Footprints in the Sand
  18. Nothing Like This Claw Found in Nature!
  19. Battle With Invisible Monster
  20. Come Back to Earth With Me
  21. Monster Pursues - Morbius Is Overcome
  22. Homecoming
  23. Overture Reprise

disc b

  1. Sounds From Venus
  2. Martian Landscape
  3. Saucer Interior
  4. Gaseous Beings
  5. Dream Controller
  6. Plates of Sound
  7. Greetings from Phobos
  8. Planetary Traffic
  9. Universal Time Signal
  10. Sooth Siren
  11. Saturn Surfer
  12. UFO #1
  13. Meteor Ride
  14. Animation Suspended
  15. Last Transmission
  16. Spaceship Alarm
  17. Moon Surface Transporter
  18. Transporter Alarm
  19. Gravity Backpack
  20. Space Bike
  21. Eye Android...Approaching
  22. Obedience Gun
  23. Contakt
  24. Shimmering Particles
  25. Docking Procedure
  26. Sexularis
  27. Bleak Landscape # 1
  28. Space Wars
  29. Are We in Space?
  30. Cold Sun
  31. Planet of Rain
  32. Planet of Life
  33. Particle Storm
  34. Venutian Ghosts
  35. Ice Wave
  36. UFO #2
  37. Hubble Deep Field #1
  38. Test Charge
  39. Alien Dashboard
  40. Bleak Landscape #2
  41. Sounds from Planet X
  42. Deep Glissando #1
  43. UFO #3
  44. Deep Glissando #2
  45. Saucer Laboratory
  46. Alien Signals
  47. Bleak Landscape #3
  48. Slow Drift
  49. Hubble Deep Field #2
  50. Signals from Earth...

Jack Dangers - all instruments

Important Records couldn't be more happy to welcome the legendary producer Jack Dangers to the Important fold. You may know Jack as the founding member of the most experimental and influencial group ever to hit the dance floor, Meat Beat Manifesto. His intensely elaborate work with Meat Beat Manifesto combined deep bass grooves, massive bursting samples and dense barrages of hip-hop, industrial and avante-funk and his giant influence is now practically immeasurable.

This double cd release contains Jack's now famous soundtrack for the legendary sci-fi film Forbidden Planet. This recording was performed live accompanying a screening of the film at the I.D.E.A.L. Music Festival in Nantes, France. Since the performance the legend has built as Jack's legions of fans have searched far and wide for this recording. As a special bonus, Forbidden Planet Explored contains a second cd full of sci-fi sound effects inspired by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (highly innovative collaborative workshop responsible for early groundbreaking electronic music which were used as the soundtrack for numerous BBC programs starting in the sixties) and vintage sci-fi films such as Forbidden Planet.

Sci Fi Sound Effects was created on his room sized EMS Synthi 100. Jack's Synthi 100 is one of the only 29 ever built and one of the only Synthi's known to be operational. From the Synthi 100 this maestro of sound is able to produce elaborate unheard tones, drones, bleeps and blobs. This cd is only available as an accompaniment to Forbidden Planet Explored.

"Intriguing and intimidating—Dangers' cultural osterizing evolves to the nth degree of studio sophistication..."- ROLLING STONE

"Without MBM's groundbreaking amalgams of hip-hop and industrial dance music, modern dance music genres such as Big Beat and Drum & Bass wouldn't exist...one of Britain's most inventive practitioners of sampladelic funk."- ALTERNATIVE PRESS

"A true innovator, MBM main man Jack Dangers helped lay down the rules for dub-inflected electronica, throwing down heavy breaks atop challenging experimental sound" - CMJ

"The sounds of futuristic riddims that both predate electronic genre nicknames and mock their ideals; one that may be defined purely by its sphere of influence on modern musicOe"- URB

"Without Meat Beat Manifesto, there'd be no Chemical Brothers..."- SELECT

"The Uber-lord of breakbeat"; ... "If you've been studying hard at Fatboy Slim's Junior High Beat School, maybe its time to graduate to the Meat Beat Academy" - MELODY MAKER

Jack Dangers of the impossibly influential electronic act Meat Beat Manifesto strips away the drum machines and samplers, leaving only his impressive vintage synthesizer to produce this live ambient work, played to accompany a screening of the classic sci-fi film Forbidden Planet. It's not the most novel idea. Electronic artists have long reached towards the cinema to give their music a more complete existence. Techno icon Jeff Mills went so far as to produce a soundtrack for the Fritz Lange silent masterpiece Metropolis, and proceeded to screen it around the world. What's interesting about Dangers' attempt is that he performed all of the music live, as well as generated sound effects which are included on the second disc. Also interesting is the fact that Forbidden Planet is not a silent film and therefore had a soundtrack of its own long before Dangers took the controls. But no matter. As a study in oscillator-produced texture and sound, few have the capabilities of Dangers to make his robust electronic machines feel utterly weightless. Like a 100 ton supercomputer, floating away in the zero gravity of space. - Joshua Glazer, All Music Guide

Why would Meat Beat Manifesto's mastermind mess with Louis and Bebe Barron's untouchable 1956 soundtrack to Forbidden Planet, an ur-document of malevolent, spacey woobs, gurgles and twitters? Because Jack has the world's only functioning EMS Synthi 100, and, damn it, he's gonna use it. This recording, live from France's I.D.E.A.L. Festival, proves that Dangers is well-suited to subtly modify and capture the questing spirit of the Barrons' original (see "Battle With Invisible Monster" for proof). Disc two contains 50 snippets of sci-fi sound effects-dozens of vintage analog-synth emissions ripe for producers seeking instant threatening atmospheres and otherworldly textures. - Dave Segal, XLR8R

"In Vital Weekly 433 I noticed that in the early pioneering days of electronic music, the late fifties, the relationship between electronic music and space became clear. Kid Baltan's 'Song Of The Second Moon' didn't deal with Yuri Gagarin (an error on this historian's side), but it delt with the launch of the sputnik. Kid Baltan was later also asked to compose the soundtrack for '2001 - A Space Oddysee', which he refused. At the same time Louis & Bebe Barron composed their purely electronic soundtrack to the film 'Forbidden Planet', which now gets a re-interpretation by Jack Dangers, aka Meat Beat Manifesto. Entirely composed on a Synthi 100 synthesizer (I believe that's an EMS one), he performed this at the 'I.D.E.A.L.' festival in Nantes during a screening of the film. Dangers stays close the original ideas of electronic music for sci-fi films, with a chilly sound, alien (pun intended) bleeps and glissando waves. I must admit, entirely my mistake, that I never saw the film, only heard the original soundtrack, and I think Dangers does a very fine job, staying that close to the original, yet keeping his own voice in this. And to make the fun complete, a second CD contains 'sci-fi sound effects', fifthy in total, so all you home astronauts can compose your own soundtracks to real or imaginairy films. I know I would..." - (FdW), Vital Weekly

"In what was actually performed live as part of the Ideal Festival in France, Jack Dangers (aka Meat Beat Manifesto) played live during a screening of the classic 1956 MGM cult film Forbidden Planet starring Leslie Nielsen and Anne Francis. These ethereal sound effects are captured in twenty-three thematic tracks that illustrate the quirky film, and at the same time give it a fully timeless quality. Dangers channels the era by creating sounds that are otherwise from a bygone time and space, but by retrofitting them to a time capsule that is nearly 50 years old, has refashioned our conscious thinking about how sound is perceived before, during and after. Watery crescents delight with the soul of an analogue-based futuristic technology, leaving the audience with a wide span of trans-space that competes with the vortex of the unknown on tracks like “Love at the Swimming Hole.” The track meanders as the mortals tie their love knots. Complete with some of the most classic sound effects that you may find in films that present radars at great depths and other cool signaling devices, Dangers unveils a secret passion for the sci-fi side of his psyche on tracks like “The Mind Booster – Creation of Matter.” Here there are hints of what has appeared in latter day MBM material. The way the material is delivered is in the classical tradition of live jams being played during a silent film, a practice that is limited today, but in this case completely penetrating. However, I am not exactly sure how it works with a talkie. This provides a brain-shorting exercise, launching you into an altered state for its duration. As if that were not enough, we are treated to an additional bonus disc of Sci Fi Sound Effects that Dangers concocted on his, and the world’s only known operational, EMS Synthi 100. This room-sized equipment delivers a full-force sci-fi montage of chilling to overtly eerie sounds. It’s a great collection of short, strange, chaotic and neutralizing tones. With all of the tracks running at under a minute and a half Dangers develops audio geometries in sound bytes here. Space transducers, laser guns, audio warfare, oh my! " - TJ Norris, Igloo


Meat Beat Manifesto - Echo In Space Dub
Meat Beat Manifesto
Echo In Space Dub

Cover Image

May 4, 2004

US 12" Tino Corp TNO 2008

this side

  1. Echo In Space Dub (Album Version) [RUN33783]
  2. Echo In Space Dub (DJ Wally remix)

reel side

  1. Retrograde Pt. 2 We R Dub 1 (Album Version) [RUN33783]
  2. Retrograde Pt. 2 We R Dub 1 (Dubloner remix)

Jack Dangers - all instruments
DJ Collage - mic


Meat Beat Manifesto - ...In Dub
Meat Beat Manifesto
...In Dub

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - ...In Dub

January 27, 2004

US CDx2 :/Run 33783

  1. Introduction Dub
  2. Echo In Space Dub [TNO2008]
  3. Spinning Round Dub
  4. Fromage Dub
  5. Intermission Dub
  6. Super Soul Dub
  7. Caramel Dub
  8. Happiness Supreme Dub
  9. Retrograde Dub
  10. Timebomb Dub
  11. Radiation Dub
  12. Retrograde Pt. 2 Dub We R 1 [TNO2008]

Jack Dangers - all instruments
Lynn Farmer - Drums and percussion (6)
DJ Collage - mic (2, 4, 6, 9, 12)

Taking the starting point and cues from several of the songs on last year's R.U.O.K? album, ...In Dub re-imagines and reinvents these, emerging well beyond the core ideas and with all the deep grooves, fx and rumbling basslines of the genre and then some! Five songs feature the one-take toasting talents of DJ Collage on the microphone, linking this ultra-modern music back to its Jamaican roots to express a unique continuum. The CD also features four new tracks and two alternate versions for a full dose of shattering electro-dub. The album also includes several completely fresh tracks along with new alternate versions for a double dose of sensory-shattering electro-dub. ...In Dub 5.1 Surround finds Jack Dangers controlling the joystick on six channels of sound to juggle, pitch, and place against the visual backdrop of original motion graphics created by longtime Dangers collaborator and video director, Ben Stokes (DJ Shadow, Meat Beat Manifesto, Public Enemy, De La Soul, The Orb). Jack invokes true sound-clashing sorcery within this wholly new medium and space-busting technology. The end result: sound unleashed and the listener placed at the heart of Meat Beat Manifesto music as never before possible.

The master of spacey dub tracks compiles a whole album of them! There's something intensely satisfying about an artist who always delivers the expected with a high level of quality. It's like having a favorite meal and a favorite restaurant and knowing that every time you go, the experience will be slightly different, you will bring your own, different perspective each time, but there will always be something comfortable and familiar. By now, Meat Beat Manifesto are fine purveyors of musical comfort food. There are no brash surprises or about faces on In Dub, which is part dub/remix record based on RUOK and part experiment with bong hit delays and rubbery bass. The elements of a classic Meat Beat record are all here, from the meticulously constructed beats to the rolling basslines to the spacious ambience that creates a space so unique that even the moments without beats are signature Meat Beat moments. For crate-diggers, sample jockeys and other boys and girls with samplers trying to unearth the wittiest, weirdest bits of sound ever to be recontexturalized into booty-moving tunes, Jack Dangers has once again beat everyone to the punch. The extended sample of an engineer explaining a missle guidance system hands down eclipses my previous favorite samples that are all, appropriately enough, from other Meat Beat records. While In Dub takes a more particular look at the Meat Beat sound through the dub microscope, there's always been a hefty dose of expected rattling high hats and percussion ringing out into space so this doesn't sound significantly different than most other Meat Beat records. It has a more narrow scope than albums like Subliminal Sandwich and Actual Sounds and Voices, but it nails just about every track in a that has come to be expected. - Matthew Jeanes, Brainwashed

...In Dub 5.1 Surround

Cover Image

January 27, 2004

US DVD :/Run 33791

  1. Introduction Dub
  2. Echo In Space Dub
  3. Spinning Round Dub
  4. Fromage Dub
  5. Intermission Dub
  6. Super Soul Dub
  7. Caramel Dub
  8. Happiness Supreme Dub
  9. Retrograde Dub
  10. Radiation Dub
  11. Thus is a Test
  12. Deep Field Recording #3

5.1 Surround DVD edition with visuals by Ben Stokes and a slightly different tracklist.

Taking the starting point and cues from several of the songs on last year's R.U.O.K? album, ...In Dub re-imagines and reinvents these, emerging well beyond the core ideas and with all the deep grooves, fx and rumbling basslines of the genre and then some! Five songs feature the one-take toasting talents of DJ Collage on the microphone, linking this ultra-modern music back to its Jamaican roots to express a unique continuum. The CD also features four new tracks and two alternate versions for a full dose of shattering electro-dub. The album also includes several completely fresh tracks along with new alternate versions for a double dose of sensory-shattering electro-dub. ...In Dub 5.1 Surround finds Jack Dangers controlling the joystick on six channels of sound to juggle, pitch, and place against the visual backdrop of original motion graphics created by longtime Dangers collaborator and video director, Ben Stokes (DJ Shadow, Meat Beat Manifesto, Public Enemy, De La Soul, The Orb). Jack invokes true sound-clashing sorcery within this wholly new medium and space-busting technology. The end result: sound unleashed and the listener placed at the heart of Meat Beat Manifesto music as never before possible.

[continued from above] The real revelation with In Dub comes with the 5.1 surround sound mix found on the DVD. I've always been amazed at the deft placement of sounds in Meat Beat Manifesto mixes, and with the extra channels of sound, the whole affair becomes an opportunity for Dangers to show off. There is no one better at sculpting sound into an immersive, breathing, pulsing atmosphere while maintaing head nodding rhythms and a sense of humor than Jack Dangers, and In Dub demonstrates that. For those hoping that the DVD edition of In Dub will contain full-on videos for the album's tracks, I would stress that the visual accompaniment provided by Ben Stokes is more along the lines of highly stylized visualizations than music videos proper. Some tracks feature pulsing graphics not unlike a quirky WinAmp viz, while others have a slightly more developed video presentation, but all in all the visual side of the DVD is more of a special feature than a main attraction. The reason to get the DVD is the 5.1 mix, something that will become more and more common, but may not be done much better than it is here. In Dub won't likely change anyone's perception of what Meat Beat Manifesto is at this point, but it's a welcome new release from an old standard that continues to refine, innovate, and satisfy. - Matthew Jeanes, Brainwashed


Meat Beat Manifesto - Storm the Studio Rmxs
Meat Beat Manifesto
Storm the Studio Rmxs

Cover Image

Jack Dangers & Ben Stokes - Storm the Studio R.M.X.S.

September 23, 2003

US CD Tino Corp TNO 2007

  1. Cease To Exist (MBM vs. DHS) by Jack Dangers and Ben Stokes
  2. God O.D. (Eight Ways To O.D. On God Mix) By Eight Frozen Modules
  3. Storm The Dub mix by Twilight Circus Dub Soundsystem - [MP3]
  4. Shadow & Substance mix by DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid
  5. God O.D. mix by Jonah Sharp - [MP3]
  6. God O.D. (Bud O.D. So U Can't C Mix) by The Mellowtrons
  7. STS 2006 (Antipopulist Mix) by High Priest
  8. I Got the Fear by The Opus - [MP3]
  9. Re-Animix (Komet Mix) by Frank Bertschneider - [MP3]
  10. God O.D. - Parts 2 (Merzbow Remix) by Masami Akita - [MP3]
  11. Storm the Studio by DJ Swamp - [MP3]
  12. God O.D. - Part 1 (Lok-Lak Mix) by Norsq
  13. MBM Re-Animator (Scanner: Kindle and Solace Mix) by Robin Rimbaud

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens
Gregg Retch

Remixes and reinterpretations of Storm the Studio

Tino Corp. Records releases Meat Beat Manifesto's Storm the Studio R.M.X.S. This album includes 13 exclusive remixes by a diverse group of artists/producers whose creative strokes speaks to the spirit of the original record's core amalgam of hip hop, dub, electronic sounds and hard beats. Also here is a collaborative remix by Jack Dangers and his Tino Corp. partner, Ben Stokes.


Meat Beat Manifesto - What Does It All Mean?
Meat Beat Manifesto
What Does It All Mean?

Cover Image

November 2002

US 12" Skor SKOR1104

side a

  1. What Does It All Mean? (So Damn Insane mix vs. DHS)

side b

  1. What Does It All Mean? [RUN33722]
  2. Fromage [RUN33722]

Jack Dangers


Cover Image

November 2002

US 12" :\Run 00003

side a

  1. What Does It All Mean? (Avalon West mix)

side b

  1. What Does It All Mean? [RUN33722]
  2. What Does It All Mean? (So Damn Insane mix vs. DHS)

Meat Beat Manifesto - Free Piece Suite
Meat Beat Manifesto
Free Piece Suite

Cover Image

October 14, 2002

US CD3 :\Run (no catalogue number)

  1. Fromage [SKOR1104]
  2. Untitled X 2
  3. Radio Atlantis - [MP3]

Jack Dangers

Came free with RUOK?


Meat Beat Manifesto - RUOK?
Meat Beat Manifesto
RUOK?

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto & DJ Z-Trip - R.U.O.K.?

October 14, 2002

US CD :\Run 33722
BE CD Quatermass QS140

  1. Yüri - [MP3]
  2. Spinning Round
  3. Horn of Jericho [MD600]
  4. What Does It All Mean? [SKOR1104]
  5. No Words Necessary
  6. Intermission
  7. Supersoul
  8. Hankerchief Head
  9. No Echo In Space
  10. Dynamite Fresh - [MP3]
  11. Retrograde
  12. Happiness Supreme

Jack Dangers
Lynn Farmner - Drums (3, 7)
Alex Patterson (3)
Z-Trip (4, 5, 8)

US copies came with Free Piece Suite

Visionary, Forefather, Innovator...these are terms that get thrown around all to loosely in the world of electronic music, but for certain individuals, these descriptions apply without question. Jack Dangers, the veteran composer and sound sculptor behind Meat Beat Manifesto, is one of these individuals. His constantly evolving musical invention has generated a long string of futuristic classics, such as "Strap Down", "God O.D.", "Helter Skelter","Psyche Out", "Radio Babylon", "Edge of No Control" and "It's the Music". Past Dangers' production/remix projects include: Public Enemy, David Bowie, Orbital, DepIche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, Coil, David Byrne, Bush, Banco de Gaia, and The Shaman. Adding to this list of heavy hitting achievements, the single, "Prime Audio Soup" from the MBM album Actual Sounds and Voices, was featured in the sci-fi fantasy blockbuster, The Matrix and on its platinum-selling soundtrack. Danger's innovative uses of samples and breakbeats have inspired countless artists (both in the dance and hip-hop worlds), putting him in a category with other visionary artists of the late 80's/early 90's such as Coldcut, The Dust Brothers, and The Bomb Squad. R.U.O.K? , MBM's seventh album and first in 4 years, represents a healthy growth in the innovative Meat Beat sound, and includes colloborations with turntablist of the moment, Z-Trip, and ambient legend Alex Paterson of The Orb.

After one of his more negligible dance tracks became the ass-kicking, bullet-dodging anthem of The Matrix, just what the hell was Jack Dangers supposed to do? Refashion his own myth, apparently. On his seventh Meat Beat Manifesto album, R.U.O.K? , Dangers dumps the cramped, sample-heavy confines of his last three albums, including his commercial-friendly 1998 Actual Sounds + Voices, for a visceral feel as immediate and confrontational as his first gritty post-industrial recordings some 13 years ago. Which is not to say the samples are gone so much as they're pushed around, bullied into second-class status by Dangers' renewed awareness of sonic depth. The Meat Beat Manifesto classics "God O.D." and "10X Faster Than the Speed of Love" were built around basic dub principles like a murderously deep bass line that rolls like a slammed Cadillac and lots of airy space peppered with percussion sounds, and it's these elements that define every track on R.U.O.K? The most eerily cool thing about "Spinning Round" isn't the quiet whirling talisman sound Dangers has used before, but the intangible silence between the bass and a very lonely tambourine. Even "What Does It All Mean," featuring copious amounts of turntablist du jour Z-Trip's freestyle scratching, takes on an earthier live hip-hop immediacy thanks to Dangers' restrained use of synths and layered breakbeats. And there's Dangers' collaboration with The Orb's Alex Paterson, "Horn of Jerico," a hypnotic funk excursion track every bit as psychedelic as anything either of them have released separately. Aside from "Spinning Round," little on R.U.O.K? possesses commercial cache, but what is that against a career-defining turn? - Heath K. Hignight, Urb

When electronica was supposed to break big, it was en vougue to namecheck the Meat Beat sound as a cornerstone of the big beat electronic party music that took over the media consciousness for a while, and later became the soundtrack for selling cars and toothpaste. But when Meat Beat's newest full-length, 'RUOK' was released, it came as a surprise to many in these parts. "Oh, you mean he's still doing stuff?" Yeah. He is. And if 'RUOK' is any indication, those of us tired of the sample-laden soundtracks designed to sell SUVs should be thankful. Without pandering to the micro-genre trends of recent, critically accepted electronic music, Meat Beat Manifesto has managed to crank out another record that is equal parts deep sound collage, bombastic beats and rolling basslines, and unabashed fun. But that's not to say that 'RUOK' isn't without its disappointments. For starters, Dangers has left the vocalizing to the samples here, stripping the Meat Beat sound of most of its political and conceptual weight. There was a time when an angrier Jack Dangers ran channel after channel of feedback into a track armed with ambiguous half-rap, half-shouting. Vocals harmonized into the sublime on tracks like "She's Unreal" from 'Subliminal Sandwich,' but they've been abandoned here. Instead, the vocal hooks come from the next most likely place for a Meat Beat record, the sampled voices used to introduce a beat or define a chorus as in the anthemic "Supersoul," and the cheeky interludes such as a sampled lesson on jive lingo with just enough interruption to make it fun. Then there's the case of two tracks that don't at all seem to fit in the Meat Beat Manifesto repertoire. The album opener, "Yuri" is all analogue bubble and synthetic percussion not unlike the sound of a DHS record, and its partner, "No Echo In Space" offers the same synthetic, technoid rhythm that trades in the James Brown funk for Kraftwerk minimalism. However, the album quickly picks up with the more recognizable Meat Beat sound with "Dynamite Fresh", a "Dogstarman" redux if ever there was one. Dangers cranks up the tempo and feeds the beat with a quick dub bass and spattering of noodly synth notes that fill up every inch of space. We haven't heard a jam like this since '99%' and yet, with all its ferocity, it demonstrates a level of refinement that most funky break music never even imagines. Meat Beat Manifesto has always offered a little more than could be easily digested, from the art/sound collage of 'Armed Audio Warfare' to the simultaneously funky and pissed off sound of "Nuclear Bomb", and 'RUOK' is thankfully no different. It challenges preconceived notions of what a Meat Beat record should sound like while also playing into expectations by recycling samples from Meat Beat records of the past in the ultimate of sonic inside jokes. There are as many ways to listen to these songs as there are sounds to be uncovered, and with the excellent bonus 3" CD included with the album's initial pressing, this should be enough to listen to and think about for quite a while. - Matthew Jeanes, Brainwashed


Cover Image

October 14, 2002

US LPx2 Skor SKOR1102

side a

  1. Yüri - [MP3]
  2. Spinning Round

side b

  1. What Does It All Mean? [SKOR1104]
  2. Hankerchief Head

side c

  1. Supersoul
  2. No Echo In Space

side d

  1. Retrograde
  2. Horn of Jericho [MD600]

Jack Dangers - Variaciones Espectrales
Jack Dangers
Variaciones Espectrales

Cover Image
Jack Dangers - Variaciones Espectrales

April 12, 2002

UK CD Bella Union BELLA705
BE CD Instinct INS7005

  1. Nano - [MP3]
  2. Every Technique - [MP3]
  3. No Secrets No Surprises - [MP3]
  4. Zxero
  5. Short Heavies
  6. 3:00 Min
  7. Echo In Space

Jack Dangers
Lynn Farmner - Drums (2, 3, 4)

Part of Bella Union's Series 7.

Variaciones Espectrales is Meat Beat Manifesto's Jack Dangers' contribution to the Series 7 collection. Per the rules of the series, the album contains seven songs recorded over the course of seven days. Neither the brevity of the album nor the time constraints of the recording process have held back Dangers' trademark studio wizardry. These seven songs are a fine addition to his storied discography. If the tracks are a bit more ambient and less fleshed-out than a formal Meat Beat Manifesto release, it doesn't keep Dangers from storming the studio left and right. Electro beeps and blips, freaky hip-hop shuffles, sci-fi sound samples, distorted, skittery beats, and bizarre breakbeats blend in the same effortless fashion as those on a Meat Beat Manifesto album. If things seem more elemental here, with fewer voice samples employed and a more chaotic feel than Actual Sounds and Voices, the music only becomes more primal, immediate, and effective in this setting. Much of Variaciones Espectrales suggests what a Luke Vibert album would sound like if Vibert dropped the cheese factor and researched the term organic. "Zxero" and "3:00 Min," in particular, suggest that Dangers is fully aware of the artists who've aped his style, and it's abundantly clear that he's one step ahead as he incorporates their innovations and derivations into his own workbook. The two songs easily see Dangers outpacing Vibert and Tom Jenkinson, his followers, as he mixes weird future dub with jazz intonations. Though Variaciones Espectrales might be too noisy to work as background music for some listeners and too experimental for the dancefloor, it's another accomplished, fascinating slice of sound/beats exploration from this consistently pioneering artist. - by Tim DiGravina, All Music Guide

Jack Dangers, musician and programmer behind the immensely influential Meat Beat Manifesto, has created a captivating and moody cauldron of sound on Variaciones Espectrales. Its signature is Dangers's remarkable knack for mixing unlikely sonic components into a beguiling whole. "No Secrets No Surprises" and "Zxero" feature busy drums, robotic bass lines, bold synthesizer whoops, and arcane sound fragments, while the syncopated drum patterns on "Short Heavies" make it unpredictable and eerie. "3:00 min" is another intriguing combination of sonic elements, including subdued vocals, saxophones, and the jazzy drum sounds that have always characterized Meat Beat Manifesto's "live" feel. The album is also rich in atmosphere. "Nano" and the aptly titled "Echo in Space" are airy and mesmerizing, yet riddled with raunchy percussion. In all, Dangers mangles the disc brilliantly with insouciant sound effects and intense processing. - Mark McCleerey


Jack Dangers - Tape Music
Jack Dangers
Tape Music

Cover Image

October 9, 2001

US 10" Flexi Disc FLX06

  1. Xe
  2. Al - [MP3]
  3. H2O
  4. ALH 8400 (Drift) - [MP3]

Jack Dangers

Came free with Sounds of the 20th Century No. 2.


Jack Dangers - Sounds of the 20th Century No. 2
Jack Dangers
Sounds of the 20th Century No. 2

Cover Image

October 9, 2001

US 7" Flexi Disc FLX02

  1. 8 Miniatures with Origins
  2. The Human Voice - [MP3]

Jack Dangers

Came as a free bonus with Tape Music.


Jack Dangers - Sounds of the 20th Century No. 1
Jack Dangers
Sounds of the 20th Century No. 1

Cover Image

October 18, 2000

US 10" Flexi Disc FLX02

  1. Peristaltic Wave - [MP3]
  2. My Shorty

Jack Dangers

Came as a free bonus with Eccentric Objects.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Eccentric Objects
Meat Beat Manifesto
Eccentric Objects

Cover Image

October 18, 2000

US 12" Tinco Corp TC2000

  1. Fragments - [MP3]
  2. Behemoth - [MP3]
  3. Structures - [MP3]
  4. #Four

Jack Dangers

Limited edition of 1000 numbered copies.
All covers were silkscreened individually by Jack Dangers.
Included a bonus flexidisc, Sounds of the 20th Century No. 1.

other image
#111


Meat Beat Manifesto - Prime Audio Soup
Meat Beat Manifesto
Prime Audio Soup

Cover Image

November 18, 1998

BE CDS Play It Again Sam BIAS352

  1. Prime Audio Soup (Edit) - [MP3] [MOV]
  2. Prime Audio Dub
  3. Prime Audio Soup (Vegetarian Soup by Boards of Canada)
  4. Prime Audio Soup (The Herbaliser Mix)
  5. Prime Audio Soup (The Concussion Mix by Biomuse)

Jack Dangers - Voice, Bass, Stuff
Lynn Farmner - Drums, Percussion
John Wilson - Prepared Guitar
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design


Cover Image

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS352

side a

  1. Prime Audio Soup (Original) - [BIAS345]
  2. Prime Audio Soup (The Herbaliser Mix)

side b

  1. Prime Audio Soup (Vegetarian Soup by Boards of Canada)
  2. Prime Audio Soup (Prime Audio Dub)

Cover Image

US 12" Nothing INT5P-6462

side a

  1. Prime Audio Soup (Album Version) - [BIAS345]
  2. Prime Audio Soup (Vegetarian Soup by Boards of Canada)

side b

  1. Prime Audio Soup (Dub)
  2. Prime Audio Soup (The Herbaliser Mix)

Promo-only 12" single - although versions have slightly different names, they are the same mixes as above.


Cover Image

US CDS Nothing INT5P-6468

  1. Prime Audio Soup - [BIAS345]
  2. Prime Audio Soup (Dub)
  3. Prime Audio Soup (Vegetarian Soup by Boards of Canada)
  4. Prime Audio Soup (The Herbaliser Mix)
  5. Prime Audio Soup (Edit)

Promo-only CD single - although versions have slightly different names, they are the same mixes as above.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Actual Sounds + Voices
Meat Beat Manifesto
Actual Sounds + Voices

Cover Image

June 30, 1998

BE CD/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS345
US CD Nothing INTD90279

  1. Everything's Under Control
  2. Prime Audio Soup - [BIAS352] [MP3] [MOV]
  3. Book of Shadows - [MP3]
  4. Oblivion/Humans - [MP3]
  5. Let's Have Fun - [MP3]
  6. The Tweek - [MP3]
  7. Acid Again - [BIAS342] [MP3]
  8. Let Go - [MP3]
  9. Where Are You?/Enuff - [MP3]
  10. Hail to the Bopp - [MP3]
  11. 3 Floors Above You - [MP3]
  12. Funny Feeling - [MP3]
  13. The Thumb - [MP3]
  14. Wavy Line - [MP3]
  15. Wildlife - [MP3]

Jack Dangers - Voice, Bass, Stuff
Lynn Farmner - Drums, Percussion
John Wilson - Prepared Guitar
Brain - Drums (12)
Dr. Pat Gleeson - Arp 6000, Echoplex (13)
Beenie Maupin - Saxophones, Bass Clarinet (12, 13)
Dan Nielson - Fender Rhodes (13), Wurlitzer (12)
Mark Pistel - Serge (13)
Mike Powell - Theremin (13), Radio (6)
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

1998 album for Play It Again Sam by the veteran techno act, featuring the single 'Acid Again'. A lesson in sonic innovation, the styles on the record vary from the breakbeatassaults of the track 'Prime Audio Soup' to the space groovecut 'The Thumb'. 15 tracks.

Meat Beat Manifesto represent everything that is right about electronic music. Perhaps it's their signature acoustic drum patterns that maintain their songs' timelessness. Perhaps it is leader Jack Dangers's ability to infuse each album with a variety of influences. With Actual Sounds and Voices, Dangers builds his songs around two jazz greats improvising in a recorded session. But the jazz influence never overpowers Meat Beat's bombastic vibe--it only enhances it. Considering their track record, it seems nearly impossible that Meat Beat Manifesto could top themselves. But records are made to be broken. CDs, however, and particularly this one, are meant to be played--over and over and over again. - Beth Bessmer

Entirely too much coffee running through my veins. The shakes are upon me, I can't focus. My fingers are rubbing together, I can feel the skin sloughing silently off, into my keyboard. I need to sleep soon, but the jitters have overtaken me. My ears are burning. Gotta reach out... find something to drive me into a mindless oblivion... a zen place alight with the fiery dance of aggressive energy. Meat Beat is there for me again... oh, my precious Meat Beat. You never fail me. Oh. Jack Dangers and company can always be relied upon for their special brand of heavy- bass grunching, hard- beat industrio-tek to help one get through moments such as these. With the menacing bass lines buried under schizophrenic drums, and bizarre samples emerging from the thickness, this music is meant for the black rooms. White strobes, glassy stares-- Meat Beat Manifesto is not merely heard, but felt deep in the intestines. Where Danger's 1996 epic Subliminal Sandwich spent far more time and energy on cross- genre doodling and experimentation, Actual Sounds and Voices grounds itself sturdily in primal rhythmic themes. Clearly intended for fans of the beat with an eye toward hard trance, the record emerges from a series of studio sessions which were later sampled and reshaped into this final product. Texture ranges from relatively low- key avant- jazzy on tracks like "The Thumb" to pure electro beat on "Three Floors Above You." Directions: open up your head, pour in the stimulants, plug your medulla oblongata into the album. Allow the pulse to control thy heartbeat. Do not be afraid. Let your ego go. Tease the fear, love the fear, Meat Beat will become your fear. Yeh. -James P. Wisdom, Pitchfork


Meat Beat Manifesto - Acid Again
Meat Beat Manifesto
Acid Again

Cover Image

June 30, 1998

BE CDS Play It Again Sam BIAS342


US CDS Nothing INT5P-6389
  1. Acid Again - [MP3] [BIAS345]
  2. Acid Again (Freddy Fresh Mix) - [MP3]
  3. Acid Again (Depth Charge Mix 1) - [MP3]
  4. Acid Again (Dub Again) - [MP3]
  5. Acid Again (Depth Charge Mix 2)

Jack Dangers - Voice, Bass, Stuff
Lynn Farmner - Drums, Percussion
John Wilson - Prepared Guitar
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design


BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS342 - PROMO

side a

  1. Acid Again - [MP3] [BIAS345]

side b

  1. Acid Again (Dub Again) - [MP3]

Cover Image

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS342
US 12" Nothing INT12-95027

    side a

    1. Acid Again - [MP3] [BIAS345]
    2. Acid Again (Freddy Fresh Mix) - [MP3]

    side b

    1. Acid Again (Depth Charge Mix 1) - [MP3]
    2. Acid Again (Dub Again) - [MP3]

Once upon a time, back when I loved the Power Station, I thought remixes were bullshit. Part of me still does, feeling a secret sting whenever I dole out my ill- gotten gains for six versions of the same track. Perhaps it was just the burritos, but why? Why remix? Well, my friends, it's taken some time and a number of galactically horrendous remixes, but the evoloution of the class has brought us to the glorious day that is today. In my twisted little world, I think of remixes as an opportunity to hear some fatty-phresh DJs rip up somebody's sound and put it back together again with shiny silver duct tape. Ohh... duct tape. Imagine my delight-- my pure oozing honeylike happiness-- when I heard I could write a review for a remix of Acid Again, what I already considered the most compelling track off Meat Beat Manifesto's most recent album Actual Sounds and Voices. You bet I was excited! Why, my penis shrank inside of my body for three days! I broke out in hives, all of my body hair (and you can bet there was plenty) fell out, and my flatulence filled the entire ward! Fortunately the nurses could bring my 1984 Wang Office Assistant in so's I could write this review! Speaking of this review, I'm gonna tell you who I think might like the remixes, and who probably won't. First of all, it's best if you're into hard industrial/ jungle. Previous exposure to Meat Beat Manifesto or perhaps Nine Inch Nails' Fixed and Further Down The Spiral is a plus, and the ability to lose yourself in some truly agressive beats is required. People who require "lyrics" need not apply, though Acid Again has voices, usually saying disturbing things. I like disturbing things, like my bedpan. It's disturbing my nose right now. The three remixers that have gotten their greasy little pinkies on "Acid Again" produce distinctly different tracks that all lean toward hard n' heavy (just like I like my women). I personally like the Freddy Fresh Mix, but hey, that's me. Who the hell is Freddy Fresh, you ask? I don't fuckin' know! Who the hell do you think I am, a music journalist? I think I got the wrong medication. Ak! -James P. Wisdom, Pitchfork


Meat Beat Manifesto - Original Fire
Meat Beat Manifesto
Original Fire

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Original Fire

May 20, 1997

US CD Nothing INTD-90127

  1. Helter Skelter '97 - [MOV]
  2. It's The Music [BIAS322]
  3. I Am Electro
  4. I Am Organic [MUTE7008]
  5. Radio Babylon [BIAS172, BIAS192]
  6. I Got The Fear (Part 5)
  7. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Toxic Mix) [BIAS252]
  8. It's The Music (Mix 2000)
  9. Radio Babylon (Luke Vibert Remix)
  10. Radio Babylon (Beach Blanket Bimbo Land - The Orb)

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Arjan McNamara - supporting cast (8)
Freaky Chakra - supporting cast (8)
Jonny Stephens - co-engineering (3, 5)
Colin James - engineering (6)
Luke Vibert - remix and additional production (9)
Alex Patterson - remix (10)
Andy Hughes - remix (10)
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

"Asbestos Lead Asbestos" is a cover, originally performed by World Domination Enterprises, written by Keith Dobson.


Cover Image

US 2x12" Nothing INT8P-6169

side a

  1. Radio Babylon [BIAS172, BIAS192]
  2. It's The Music [BIAS322]

side b

  1. Radio Babylon (Luke Vibert Remix pt 1)
  2. Radio Babylon (Luke Vibert Remix pt 2)

side c

  1. Radio Babylon (Beach Blanket Bimbo Land - The Orb)
  2. I Am Electro

side d

  1. Helter Skelter '97 - [MOV]
  2. I Got The Fear (Pt 5)

Promo-only 2x12" single - "Radio Babylon (Luke Vibert Remix pt 2)" is a vinyl exclusive.

Okay, I was turned off at first because hey, who are they to go telling me how to beat meat? I mean, Karl Marx was bad enough with that Communist thing. I know what to do. Don't need no Manifesto ter tell me. Then I listened to it. Remixes. You know what that means, right? Weak-ass, thinned-out songs. No. Original Fire gave my head and eardrums a solid sledgehammering with unceasing electro/industrial beat for 60 minutes without any loss of interest or kneejerk rejection reaction. Several times I looked down to see my foot tapping. I even thought a few times: "That's a damn good beat, never heard that before." Voices are pure background (if you can't hack Josh Wink's "Are You There?", forget it). It's repetitive and heavy and god only knows why, but I like it. -James P. Wisdom, Pitchfork


Meat Beat Manifesto - It's the Music
Meat Beat Manifesto
It's the Music

Cover Image

September, 1996

BE 12"/CDS Play It Again Sam BIAS322

  1. It's Just the Music
  2. It's the Music [INTD-90127]
  3. I Control (Audio Collage #2)
  4. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Plug Mix) [BIAS252]

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Luke Vibert - remix and additional production (4)
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

"Asbestos Lead Asbestos" is a cover, originally performed by World Domination Enterprises, written by Keith Dobson.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Subliminal Sandwich
Meat Beat Manifesto
Subliminal Sandwich

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Subliminal Sandwich

June 4, 1996

BE 2xCD/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS302
US 2xCDS/CS Nothing INTD2-90069

disc a

  1. Sound Innovation
  2. Nuclear Bomb [MUTE7008]
  3. Long Periods Of Time
  4. 1979
  5. Future Worlds
  6. What's Your Name?
  7. She's Unreal
  8. Asbestos Lead Asbestos - [MOV] [BIAS252]
  9. Mass Producing Hate
  10. Radio Mellotron
  11. Assasinator
  12. Phone Calls From The Dead
  13. Lucid Dream
  14. Addiction
  15. No Purpose No Design
  16. Cancer
  17. Transmission [BIAS292]
  18. We Done

disc b

  1. Set Your Receivers
  2. Mad Bomber/The Woods [BIAS292]
  3. The Utterer
  4. United Nations (E.T.C.)
  5. Stereophrenic
  6. Teargas
  7. Plexus
  8. Electric People
  9. Tweekland
  10. Simulacra

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Joe Gore - guitar (A5, A6, A7, A14)
Tippa Irie, Papa Levi, & Sandy - vocals (A2, A11)
Hell Louise - vocals (A6, A17)
Arjan McNamara - Jupiter 8 (B5, B8)
Mark Pistel - Moog, OB 8, E Bow, theremin (B3, B8, B9)
Mike Powell - theremin, b voice (A3, A9, B5, B8)
Philip Steir - octapad (B2)
Jonny Stephens - guitar (A8), 100 M Ststem OBM-X (B3, B5)
Ben Stokes - percussion (B3)
Lee Walker - Jupiter 8, Jupiter 4 (B4, B7)
John Wilson - feedback generator (B3)
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

"Asbestos Lead Asbestos" is a cover, originally performed by World Domination Enterprises, written by Keith Dobson.
The European 2xCD release was limited. The more common release was only disc A.

BE 3xLP Play It Again Sam BIAS302 LPX

disc a

  1. Sound Innovation
  2. Nuclear Bomb [MUTE7008]
  3. Long Periods Of Time
  4. 1979

disc b

  1. Future Worlds
  2. What's Your Name?
  3. She's Unreal
  4. Phone Calls From The Dead

disc c

  1. Asbestos Lead Asbestos - [MOV] [BIAS252]
  2. Mass Producing Hate
  3. Radio Mellotron
  4. Assasinator

disc c

  1. Cancer
  2. Lucid Dream
  3. Addiction
  4. No Purpose No Design
  5. Transmission [BIAS292]
  6. We Done

disc e

  1. Set Your Receivers
  2. Mad Bomber/The Woods [BIAS292]
  3. The Utterer

disc e

  1. United Nations (E.T.C.)
  2. Plexus
  3. Electric People

Meat Beat Manifesto - Asbestos Lead Asbestos
Meat Beat Manifesto
Asbestos Lead Asbestos

Cover Image

May, 1996

BE 12"/CD Play It Again Sam BIAS252

  1. Asbestos Lead Asbestos - [MOV] [BIAS252]
  2. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Toxic Mix)
  3. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (De Tox Dub)
  4. Untitled

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

"Asbestos Lead Asbestos" is a cover, originally performed by World Domination Enterprises, written by Keith Dobson.


Cover Image

US 12" Nothing INT8P-6050

side a

  1. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Plug Mix)
  2. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Joined at the Hip Mix)

side b

  1. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Toxic Mix) [INTD-90127]
  2. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Radio Edit)
  3. Asbestos Lead Asbestos (Pedigree Dogs Don't Like the Smell of Your Children)

Luke Vibert - remix (A1)
Charlie Clouser - remix (A2)
The Mellowtrons - remix (B3)


Meat Beat Manifesto - Transmission
Meat Beat Manifesto
Transmission

Cover Image

April, 1996

BE 12"/CD Play It Again Sam BIAS292

  1. Transmission (Edit) - [BIAS302]
  2. Transmission (Stately Pleasure Dub)
  3. Transmission (Burning Fire mix)
  4. Mad Bomber / The Woods (Edit) - [BIAS302]

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design


Meat Beat Manifesto - Nuclear Bomb
Meat Beat Manifesto
Nuclear Bomb

Cover Image

October 24, 1995

US 12" Mute 24596-7008

  1. Nuclear Bomb (Illuminous Mix) - [BIAS302]
  2. Nuclear Bomb (Trouble It Mix)
  3. Nuclear Bomb (Illuminator Mix)
  4. Nuclear Bomb (Radio Edit)
  5. Electric People (Version Version)
  6. Love Mad (Version 93)
  7. I Am Organic - [INTD-90127]

Written, produced, and engineered by Jack Dangers
Rich Borge - cover illustration and design

Although there was never a commercial release for the "Nuclear Bomb" single, it did manage to get pressed as a US test-pressing only 12".


Meat Beat Manifesto - Peel Session
Meat Beat Manifesto
Peel Session

Cover Image

December 2, 1993

UK CDEP Strange Fruit SFPS088

  1. Fire Number 9
  2. Soul Driver
  3. Drop
  4. Radio Babylon

Jack Dangers - vocals & sound FX
Jonny Stevens - gtr & programmes
Simon Collins - drums

Recorded live in the studio on December 13, 1992 for John Peel's show on BBC Radio One.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Circles
Meat Beat Manifesto
Circles

Cover Image

1993

US CD/CS Mute 8764

  1. Circles (remix)

Jack Dangers - Vocals, Bass, Mellotron, 100-M System, Samples
Jonny Stephens - Guitar, Lap Steel, Dyna-Mic, Jupiter 8, Samples

The cassette promo had the same song repeated three times on each side.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Mindstream
Meat Beat Manifesto
Mindstream

Cover Image

January, 1993

BE 12"/CD Play It Again Sam BIAS232

  1. Mindstream (Stream of Consciousness Mix) - [MOV]
  2. Mindstream (Psychedelically Speaking)
  3. Mindstream (Fire Escape Version)
  4. Paradise Found - [MUTE66517]

Jack Dangers - Vocals, Bass, Mellotron, 100-M System, Samples
Jonny Stephens - Guitar, Lap Steel, Dyna-Mic, Jupiter 8, Samples


Cover Image

BE 12"/CD Play It Again Sam BIAS232R

  1. Mindstream (Mind the Bend Mix)
  2. Mindstream (Aphex Twin Remix)
  3. Original Control (Electro the Robot)

Orbital - remix (1)
Aphex Twin - remix (2)
DHS - remix (3)

Both singles were combined to a single CD for the US release on Mute, minus "Paradise Found."


Meat Beat Manifesto - Satyricon
Meat Beat Manifesto
Satyricon

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Satyricon

September 28, 1992

BE CD/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS202
US CD/CS Mute 61395

  1. Pot Sounds
  2. Mindstream - [MOV]
  3. Drop
  4. Original Control (Version 1)
  5. Your Mind Belongs To The State
  6. Circles
  7. The Sphere
  8. Brainwashed This Way / Zombie / That Shirt
  9. Original Control (Version 2)
  10. Euthanasia
  11. Edge Of No Control Pt 1
  12. Edge Of No Control Pt 2 - [MOV]
  13. Untold Stories
  14. Son Of Sam
  15. Track 15
  16. Placebo

Jack Dangers - Vocals, Bass, Mellotron, 100-M System, Samples
Jonny Stephens - Guitar, Lap Steel, Dyna-Mic, Jupiter 8, Samples
Brendon Hamley - Drums (5)
Barry Ganberg - Keyboards (10)

BE LP+12" Play It Again Sam BIAS202X

side a

  1. Pot Sounds
  2. Mindstream - [MOV]
  3. Drop
  4. Original Control (Version 1)
  5. Circles
  6. The Sphere

side b

  1. Euthanasia
  2. Edge Of No Control Pt 1
  3. Edge Of No Control Pt 2 - [MOV]
  4. Untold Stories
  5. Placebo

side c

  1. Original Control (Version 2)
  2. Brainwashed This Way / Zombie / That Shirt

side d

  1. Your Mind Belongs To The State
  2. Son Of Sam
  3. Track 15

Meat Beat Manifesto - Edge of No Control
Meat Beat Manifesto
Edge of No Control

Cover Image

August, 1992

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS222

side a

  1. Edge of No Control - [MOV]

side b

  1. Original Control (Version 3)
  2. The Circular Cosmic Spot

Jack Dangers - Vocals, Bass, Mellotron, 100-M System, Samples
Jonny Stephens - Guitar, Lap Steel, Dyna-Mic, Jupiter 8, Samples


Cover Image

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS222R

side a

  1. Edge of No Control (Part 2) - [MOV]
  2. Edge of No Control (Take Control - Orbital Reply)

side b

  1. Edge of No Control (Satyriconsolidated - Consolidated Reply)
  2. Edge of No Control (Consolidated Dub)

Both singles were combined to a single CD for the US release on Mute.
The European CD single is four track

US 12" Mute 66375

side a

  1. Edge of No Control (Part 2) - [MOV]
  2. Edge of No Control (Take Control - Orbital Reply)

side b

  1. Edge of No Control (Satyriconsolidated - Consolidated Reply)
  2. Edge of No Control (Consolidated Dub)

Both the US promotional 12" and actual commercial 12" for "Edge Of No Control" incorrectly identify (on their records' labels) track #B2 as "Edge Of No Control (Take Control - Orbital Reply)".

BE CD Play It Again Sam BIAS222

  1. Edge of No Control - [MOV]
  2. Edge of No Control (Take Control - Orbital Reply)
  3. Edge of No Control (Satyriconsolidated - Consolidated Reply)
  4. The Circular Cosmic Spot

Meat Beat Manifesto - 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love
Meat Beat Manifesto
10x Faster Than the Speed of Love

Cover Image

1991

US CDS Mute 8322

  1. 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love (radio mix)
  2. 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love (LP version)

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens - programming


Meat Beat Manifesto - Now
Meat Beat Manifesto
Now

Cover Image

September, 1991

US CDS Mute 66517

  1. Now (remix edit)
  2. Paradise Found - [BIAS232]
  3. Paradise Now
  4. Love Mad
  5. Children of the Beloved (live)

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens - programming

The US CD single for "Now" incorrectly identifies track #1 as simply "Now (remix)".
Track 5 recorded live at The Ritz, NYC, November 1989.


Cover Image

US 12" Mute ST-ED 5555

side a

  1. Now (remix)
  2. I'm In Paradise Now

side b

  1. Paradise Found - [BIAS232]
  2. Paradise Now

Promotional only 12".


Cover Image

Cover Image

BE 12" Play It Again Stam PROMO BIAS 011

side a

  1. I'm In Paradise Now

side b

  1. Paradise Found - [BIAS232]
  2. Paradise Now

Translucent red vinyl promotional-only 12" single.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Version Galore
Meat Beat Manifesto
Version Galore

Cover Image

February 1991

BE CDEP Play It Again Sam BIAS192

  1. Radio Babylon (Space Children Intro) - [BIAS182]
  2. Radio Babylon (Version Galore) - [BIAS182]
  3. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Strip Down) - [BIAS182]
  4. Psyche-Out (Version 1) - [MOV] [BIAS182]
  5. Psyche Dub - [BIAS182]
  6. Radio Babylon - [BIAS172, INTD-90127]
  7. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Mix) - [BIAS182]

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens
Andrew Weatherall, Dubmaster Thrash - remix (3, 7)

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS192

side a

  1. Radio Babylon (Space Children Intro) - [BIAS182]
  2. Radio Babylon (Version Galore) - [BIAS182]
  3. Radio Babylon - [BIAS172, INTD-90127]

side b

  1. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Strip Down) - [BIAS182]
  2. Psyche Dub - [BIAS182]
  3. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Mix) - [BIAS182]

Meat Beat Manifesto - Psyche-Out
Meat Beat Manifesto
Psyche-Out

Cover Image

September 1990

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS182

  1. Psyche-Out (Version 1) - [MOV] [BIAS192]
  2. Psyche-Out (Version 2)

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens

BE CDS Play It Again Sam BIAS182

  1. Psyche-Out (Version 1) - [MOV] [BIAS192]
  2. Psyche-Out (Version 2)
  3. Psyche Dub - [BIAS192]

Cover Image

BE 12" Play It Again Sam BIAS182R

  1. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Strip Down) - [BIAS192]
  2. Radio Babylon - [BIAS172, INTD-90127]

Andrew Weatherall, Dubmaster Thrash - remix (a)


Cover Image

US CDS Mute 66579

  1. Psyche-Out (Version 1) - [MOV] [BIAS192]
  2. Psyche-Out (Version 2)
  3. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Strip Down) - [BIAS192]
  4. Radio Babylon (Space Children Intro) - [BIAS192]
  5. Radio Babylon (Version Galore) - [BIAS192]

Andrew Weatherall, Dubmaster Thrash - remix (3)


Cover Image

US 12" Mute ST-ED 5512

side a

  1. Psyche-Out (Version 1) - [MOV] [BIAS192]
  2. Psyche-Out (Version 2)
  3. Psyche Dub - [BIAS192]

side b

  1. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Strip Down) - [BIAS192]
  2. Psyche-Out (Sex Skank Mix) - [BIAS192]

Andrew Weatherall, Dubmaster Thrash - remix (B1, B2)


Meat Beat Manifesto - 99%
Meat Beat Manifesto
99%

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - 99%

May 1990

BE LP/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS180
US LP/CS Mute 61026

side a

  1. Now
  2. Psyche-Out
  3. All the Things You Are
  4. Hello Teenage America
  5. 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love - [MUTE8322]

side b

  1. 99%
  2. Dog Star Man - [BIAS142]
  3. Helter Skelter - [BIAS172]
  4. Think Fast
  5. Hallucination Generation
  6. Deviate

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens
Craig Morrison
Marcus Adams

BE CD Play It Again Sam BIAS180
US CD Mute 61026

  1. Now
  2. Psyche-Out
  3. All the Things You Are
  4. Hello Teenage America
  5. 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love - [MUTE8322]
  6. 99%
  7. Dog Star Man / Helter Skelter
  8. Think Fast
  9. Hallucination Generation
  10. Deviate

JP CD Alfa Records ALCB-119

  1. Now
  2. Psyche-Out
  3. All the Things You Are
  4. Hello Teenage America
  5. 10x Faster Than the Speed of Love - [MUTE8322]
  6. 99%
  7. Dog Star Man / Helter Skelter
  8. Think Fast
  9. Hallucination Generation
  10. Deviate
  11. Dog Star Man - [BIAS142]
  12. Still Falling - [BIAS142]
  13. Dog Star - [BIAS142]
  14. DV8 - [BIAS142]
  15. Helter Skelter - [BIAS172]
  16. Radio Babylon - [BIAS172, BIAS182, INTD-90127]

Meat Beat Manifesto - Helter Skelter/Radio Babylon
Meat Beat Manifesto
Helter Skelter/Radio Babylon

Cover Image

May 1990

BE 12"/CDS/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS172

  1. Helter Skelter - [BIAS180]
  2. Radio Babylon - [BIAS182, INTD-90127]

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens
Craig Morrison
Marcus Adams

Issued in the USA through WaxTrax! then Caroline.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Armed Audio Warfare
Meat Beat Manifesto
Armed Audio Warfare

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Armed Audio Warfare

August 1990

UK LP Sweatbox LD9048
US LP WaxTrax! WAX9106

side a

  1. Genocide
  2. Repulsion
  3. Mister President
  4. Reanimator - [SOX037]

side b

  1. I Got the Fear - [SOX023]
  2. Kick That Man - [SOX023]
  3. Kneel and Buzz - [SOX023]
  4. Fear Version - [SOX023]
  5. Give Your Body Its Freedom (edit) - [SOX032]

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens

The UK LP has the call number "SAX 045" etched into its run-out grooves.

The US test-pressing LP comes in a generic white die-cut sleeve. The record's HUB-SERVALL RECORDS MFG. CORP label has a rectangular black [computer print] on white sticker affixed which features the tracklisting. The record's run-out groove has the call numbers, "SAX 045", "BIAS 189" and "WAX 7106", etched into each side of it.

The US test-pressing LP for "Armed Audio Warfare" incorrectly lists the songs "Marrs Needs Women" and "Cutman" as being on this release. Also, "I Got The Fear" is listed as being the last track on Side A, when in actuality it is the first track on Side B. The corrections are as appear above.

The LP releases for "Armed Audio Warfare" incorrectly identify track #B2 as "Kneel And Buzz", and track #B3 as "Kick That Man" (switching them around in the tracklisting from how they really appear on the records). On the Dutch LP for this release however, the correct tracklisting does appear on the record's label, but (still) not on its picture sleeve. The corrections are as appear above.

On the LP releases for "Armed Audio Warfare" track #B5 has been slightly edited down from its original form specifically for this album, hence it being tagged with "(armed audio warfare edit)". Compare this "Give Your Body Its Freedom" to its unedited/full- length version which appears on the UK cd single for "Strap Down" (SOX 032 CD). The correction is as appears above.

UK CD Sweatbox LD9048
US CD WaxTrax! WAX7106

  1. Genocide
  2. Repulsion
  3. Mister President
  4. Reanimator - [SOX037]
  5. I Got the Fear - [SOX023]
  6. Kick That Man - [SOX023]
  7. Kneel and Buzz - [SOX023]
  8. Fear Version - [SOX023]
  9. Give Your Body Its Freedom (edit) - [SOX032]
  10. Marrs Needs Women
  11. Cutman

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens

The original UK pressing would have been on SWEATBOX RECORDS (SAX 045) in May of 1988, but its master recordings were damaged in a fire. Because this album was never released in its original form, the intended tracklisting is unknown.

All three formats of the initial US pressing of "Armed Audio Warfare" [on WAX TRAX! RECORDS] were misprinted, with their spines' titles instead reading: "Meat Beat Manifesto". The cassette and CD were later re-printed with the corrected title, but the lp was not.

The US CD reissuance for "Armed Audio Warfare" comes with a totally different picture sleeve and disc art than that of any of its previous releases. Also, the disc for this release misspells its title as "Armed Audio Warefare".

The CD releases for "Armed Audio Warfare" incorrectly identify track #6 as "Kneel And Buzz", and track #7 as "Kick That Man" (switching them around in the tracklisting from how they really appear on the discs/cassettes). The corrections are as appear above.

On the CD releases for "Armed Audio Warfare" track #9 has been slightly edited down from its original form specifically for this album, hence it being tagged with "(armed audio warfare edit)". Compare this "Give Your Body Its Freedom" to its unedited/full- length version which appears on the UK CD single for "Strap Down" (SOX 032 CD). The correction is as appears above.

The US CD reissue for "Armed Audio Warfare" incorrectly identifies track #10 as "Mars Needs Women". The correction is as appears above.

On the CD and cassette releases track #10, "Marrs Needs Women" is not the same song that appears (as "Mars Needs Women") on the releases for the "God O.D." single.

Reissued in 1993 on Mute with a completely new cover by Rich Borge. [MUTE9002]
Remastered and re-reissued on July 22, 2003 on :/Run with another completely new cover by Rich Borge. [LKS33758]


Meat Beat Manifesto - Dog Star Man
Meat Beat Manifesto
Dog Star Man

Cover Image

May 1990

BE CD3 Play It Again Sam BIAS142
BE CDS Play It Again Sam US BIUS3037

  1. Dog Star Man - [BIAS180]
  2. Still Falling
  3. Dog Star
  4. DV8

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens
Craig Morrison
Marcus Adams

Issued in the USA first through WaxTrax! then Caroline.
The European CD release is a 3" CD single while the US version is full-sized.

BE 12"/CS Play It Again Sam BIAS142

side a

  1. Dog Star Man - [BIAS180]
  2. Still Falling

side b

  1. Dog Star
  2. DV8

The US version was the same pressing with a sticker slapped on it.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Storm the Studio
Meat Beat Manifesto
Storm the Studio

Cover Image

Meat Beat Manifesto - Storm the Studio

February 20, 1989

UK 2xLP Sweatbox SDX040
US 2xLP WaxTrax! WAX066

side a

  1. God O.D (Part 1)
  2. God O.D (Part 2)
  3. God O.D (Part 3)
  4. God O.D (Part 4)

side b

  1. Re-Animator (Part 1)
  2. Re-Animator (Part 2)
  3. Re-Animator (Part 3)
  4. Re-Animator (Part 4)

side c

  1. Strap Down (Part 1)
  2. Strap Down (Part 2)
  3. Strap Down (Part 3)

side d

  1. I Got the Fear (Part 1)
  2. I Got the Fear (Part 2)
  3. I Got the Fear (Part 3)
  4. I Got the Fear (Part 4)

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

The European double-LP for "Storm The Studio" comes with high-quality black & blue [print] on brown/grey cardboard record jackets (housed within the main picture sleeve). The US double-LP for this release features the same graphics, but instead printed on standard grade white paper jackets.

Each disc of the US test-pressing double-LP for "Storm The Studio" comes in its own (separate) generic white die-cut sleeve. Their records' HUB-SERVALL RECORDS MFG. CORP labels each have a rectangular black [computer print] on white sticker affixed which include the tracklisting.

The double-lp releases for "Storm The Studio" all have the following message etched into their run-out grooves, on Side D (the "I Got The Fear" side): "LOT IN SODOM".


Cover Image

UK CD Sweatbox SDX040
US CD WaxTrax! WAX066

  1. God O.D (Part 1)
  2. God O.D (Part 2)
  3. God O.D (Part 3)
  4. God O.D (Part 4)
  5. Re-Animator (Part 1)
  6. Re-Animator (Part 2)
  7. Re-Animator (Part 3)
  8. Re-Animator (Part 4)
  9. Strap Down (Part 1)
  10. Strap Down (Part 2)
  11. I Got the Fear (Part 1)
  12. I Got the Fear (Part 2)
  13. I Got the Fear (Part 3)
  14. I Got the Fear (Part 4)

Jack Dangers
Jonny Stephens

The initial CD releases incorrectly identify track #11 as "Strap Down (part 3)", track #12 as "I Got The Fear (part 1)", track #13 as "I Got The Fear (part 2)", track #14 as "I Got The Fear (part 3)", and track #15 (which doesn't even exist on the cd) as "I Got The Fear (part 4)". In other words the song, "Strap Down (part 3)", appears in their tracklistings but does not actually appear on the discs themselves. The corrected tracklisting does appear on the US CD on Mute. The corrections are as appear above.

Reissued in 1993 on Mute with a completely new cover by Rich Borge. [MUTE9001]
Remastered and re-reissued on July 22, 2003 on :/Run with another completely new cover by Rich Borge. [LKS33757]


Meat Beat Manifesto - God O.D
Meat Beat Manifesto
God O.D

Cover Image

November 14, 1988

UK 12" Sweatbox SOX039
US 12" WaxTrax! WAX065

  1. God O.D
  2. Mars Needs Women

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

UK CD Sweatbox SOX039
US CD WaxTrax! WAX065

  1. God O.D
  2. Mars Needs Women
  3. Feelin' Dangers

Space Children - Let's Go Disco
Space Children
Let's Go Disco

September 26, 1988

UK 12" Sweatbox SOX038

  1. Let's Go Disco

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

The UK white-label test pressing of the single-sided 12" for "Let's Go Disco" comes with no sleeve, and features no print on its record's labels whatsoever.

The UK 12" releases for "Let's Go Disco" have the following message etched into their run-out grooves, on Side A: "JACK IS FOETAL".

A 7" edit version appears on the Archive Things 1982-1988 / Purged double CD.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Re-Animator
Meat Beat Manifesto
Re-Animator

November 14, 1988

UK 12" Sweatbox SOX037

  1. Reanimator (       ) - [LD9048]
  2. Reanimator (       )
  3. Reanimator (       )

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

Although there was never a commercial release for the "Re-Animator" single, it did manage to get pressed as a UK white label test-pressing only 12".


Perennial Divide - Leathernecks
Perennial Divide
Leathernecks

1988

UK 12" Sweatbox SOX036
US 12" WaxTrax! WAX067

side a

  1. Monster

side b

  1. Leathernecks
  2. --------------- [leathernecks - track #B2]

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

There was never a commercial release for the "Leathernecks" ep., but it did manage to get pressed as a white label test-pressing only 12" ep. in both the UK and US (regardless of the fact that it was listed as an upcoming release in an April/May 1989 WAX TRAX! 'new release' advertisement which appeared in several magazines at the time).

The UK white-label test pressing-only 12" ep. for "Leathernecks" is limited to 200 copies.

The US test pressing-only 12" ep. for "Leathernecks" comes in a white generic die-cut sleeve. The record's label is a HUB-SERVALL RECORD MFG. CORP. label, and has a rectangular black [computer print] on white sticker affixed which features the track listing. The record's run-out groove has the call numbers, "WAX 067" and "SOX 036", etched into each side of it.

The US test pressing-only 12" ep. for "Leathernecks" incorrectly identifies track #A1 as "Leathernecks", track #B1 as "Monster", and omits [the untitled] track #B2, "--------------- [leathernecks - track #B2]", from its tracklisting altogether. The corrections are as appear above.

Remixes appear on the Archive Things 1982-1988 / Purged double CD.


Meat Beat Manifesto - Strap Down
Meat Beat Manifesto
Strap Down

Cover Image

June 1988

UK 7" Sweatbox OX032

  1. Strap Down (video version) - [MOV]
  2. Give Your Body Its Freedom (edit)

All titles by Jack Dangers
Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

There is no printing which identifies these songs as being edited 7" versions.

UK 12" Sweatbox SOX032

side a

  1. Strap Down (Roar of the Underground)

side b

  • Give Your Body Its Freedom
  • Wall To Wall

  • Cover Image

    UK 7" Sweatbox OX032R

    1. Strap Down (The Sound Defence Policy Remix - 7" edit)
    2. Wall To Wall

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX032

    side a

    1. Strap Down (The Sound Defence Policy Remix)

    side b

    1. Give Your Body Its Freedom
    2. Wall To Wall

    Cover Image

    UK CDS Sweatbox SOX032CD

    1. Strap Down (The Sound Defence Policy Remix - 7" edit)
    2. Strap Down (The Sound Defence Policy Remix)
    3. Give Your Body Its Freedom

    The UK cd single for "Strap Down" incorrectly identifies both tracks 1 and 2 as simply "Strap Down". The corrections are as appear above.


    Cover Image

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX032A

    1. Strap Down (Roar of the Underground)
    2. Give Your Body Its Freedom (7" edit)

    The UK promotional-only 12" for "Roar Of The Underground / Give Your Body Its Freedom" incorrectly identifies track #B1 as simply "Give Your Body Its Freedom". The correction is as appears above.


    Meat Beat Manifesto - I Got the Fear
    Meat Beat Manifesto
    I Got the Fear

    Cover Image

    December 1987

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX023

    side a

    1. I Got the Fear - [MOV]
    2. Kick That Man - [LD9048]

    side b

    1. Kneel and Buzz - [LD9048]
    2. -------------

    All titles by Jack Dangers
    Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

    Limited to 1500 copies

    Etched into the run-out grooves are on Side A: "B RE FRESH ED", and on Side B: "NEIL AND BUZZ YOUR EAGLE HAS LANDED WHAT IS THE SAME MY ESCAPE FROM TERROR CENTS OF STYLEE CUT PRICE CULTURE MORE HOG-WASH THE LATEX BARRIER".

    UK 7" Sweatbox SOX023R

    1. I Got the Fear (edit) - [MOV]
    2. I Got the Fear (burnt version)

    The UK promotional-only 7" for "I Got The Fear" is also referred to as "I Got The Fear - Absolutely Fucking Free".

    The UK promotional-only 7" for "I Got The Fear" is limited to 500 copies. This release comes in a white generic die-cut (one-side only) sleeve with a rectangular black [photocopied computer print] on white sleeve sticker affixed to its front (featuring the release information), plus a large square black [photocopied print] on white sticker affixed to its back (which features a photocopied review of a (then) recent live performance by MEAT BEAT MANIFESTO, plus an accompanying photograph). Additionally, the sticker states: "Due to continuous public demand for a mix of the Meat Beat Manifesto (hot hot hot hot) single "I Got The Fear" without the offending use of that notorious 'F***' word, SWEATBOX are proud to present the seven inch version for your listening pleasure. Completely and absolutely 'fucking' free.".

    The UK promotional-only 7" for "I Got The Fear" has the call number "OX23" etched into its run-out grooves, while the call-number listed on the sleeve sticker reads "SOX 023R". The record's labels are white with a large red 'MBM' logo stamped onto Side A.

    The UK promotional-only 7" for "I Got The Fear" incorrectly identifies both tracks as simply "I Got The Fear". The corrections are as appear above.


    Cover Image

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX023R

    1. I Got the Fear (Titanium Mix)
    2. I Got the Fear (Without Jack)

    The UK promotional 12" for "I Got The Fear (Titanium Mix)" comes in a white generic die-cut sleeve. The record's labels are pink with a large red `MBM' logo stamped onto Side A.

    Both UK 12" pressings for "I Got The Fear (Titanium Mix)" have the following messages etched into their run-out grooves, on Side A: "JACK YOUR BODY SON FIRE", and on Side B: "SUCK A LITTLE BIT HARDER".

    UK CDS Sweatbox SOX023CD

    1. I Got the Fear (   )
    2. Kick That Man - [LD9048]
    3. Kneel and Buzz - [LD9048]
    4. Fear Version - [LD9048]

    The CD single was planned but never manufactured.


    Perennial Divide - Bee Head
    Perennial Divide
    Bee Head

    Cover Image

    May 1987

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX020

    side a

    1. Bee Head
    2. World Spread

    side b

    1. Gentle as a Fawn Is Warm
    2. Clamp

    All titles by Jack Dangers
    Produced by The Sound Defence Policy

    Etchings on Side A: "TORTURED MOST SEVERELY", and on Side B: "IT'S LIKE PRAYER".

    UK 7" Sweatbox SOX020

    1. Bee Head (7" version) - [B0CD06]

    The single-sided promotional-only 7" for "Bee Head" is limited to 500 copies, and comes only in a generic die-cut (one side only) white paper record jacket. Side A's record label states: "From the forthcoming 4 track e.p. 'Bee Head'".

    One second after the very end of the song "Bee Head (7" version)", a very faint voice can be heard if the volume is turned up to a very high level. It is that of John Corrigan yelling during the actual time of this record's pressing/mastering - somehow the machine which pressed the original acetate was able to pick up his voice (the three words which he shouts are indecipherable, however).


    Perennial Divide - Purge
    Perennial Divide
    Purge

    Cover Image

    May 1987

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX020

    side a

    1. Blow
    2. Parricide
    3. Word of the Lord
    4. Captain Swing
    5. Rescut

    side b

    1. The Fall
    2. Trip
    3. Tuna Hell
    4. Burning Dogs
    5. End of the Line

    All titles by Jack Dangers

    The first pressing of the UK lp for "Purge" (in glossy slate green picture sleeve) is limited to 2000 copies.

    The second pressing comes in a totally different picture sleeve (in brown sleeve) and record jacket picture sleeve, but with the same exact record and record labels as that of its original pressing. Initial copies of this reissuance also came with the UK 12" for "Burn Down" (SOX 018) shrinkwrapped to it (and a circular black [print] on white sleeve sticker affixed).

    Etchings on Side A [that side]: "YOU TO TUGGY TOO TOO", and on Side B [that side]: "AW VS CARPETS".

    An instrumental remix of the album appears in its entirety on the Archive Things 1982-1988 / Purged double CD.


    Perennial Divide - Burn Down
    Perennial Divide
    Burn Down

    Cover Image

    July 1986

    UK 12" Sweatbox SOX018

    side a

    1. The New Foundation of Mankind

    side b

    1. The Permanent Way

    All titles by Jack Dangers

    Etchings on Side A: "THE HAMMERMAN POET", and on Side B: "EAT SHIT AND DIE".

    7" edits appear on the Archive Things 1982-1988 / Purged double CD.


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